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San Francisco Public Library 

Government Information Center 
San Francisco Pubiic Library 
100 Lai kin Street, 5th Floor 
San Francisco, CA 94102 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 






City and County of San Francisco ^ Art Commission 

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM COMMITTEE ... February 17, 1983 - 10AM 
<^ Art Commission Office, k$ Hyde Street. 

DOCUMENTS DEP1 

Present: Chairman Piero Petri, Commissioners Paterson and LaRocca, MAD IQft^ 
Staff: oJoan El 1 isorvWong, AJfonsd.MaeieU Acme MarieiJheMen MHrw ]Z! 

Agenda : Neighborhood Arts Program Consortium ®, A N f *^!^Jadv 

Presentation of a document prepared for the City Attorney was done by Maciel. 
It explains the present working of the Neighborhood Arts Program Consortium. 
Commissioner Petri asked who ultimately would be responsible for the program- 
ming content at the cultural centers. Ellison Wong responded that the Art 
Commission would be held responsible for the programming content. 
The importance to negociate an agreement with the NAP Consortium that would 
reflect, a) the donation system, b) the division of responsibility in pro- 
gramming, c) the facilities - was another series of concern expressed by members 
of the committee. 

Commissioner Paterson asked why the City insisted on having the building open 
only b*' the staff. Maciel replied that the matter was a liability issue; and 
that having <\ the facility open by the staff of the organization made programming 
available six days instead of five days during the week. 

Comments were made on the resolution, "... the Neighborhood Arts Program Consortium 
responsible for policy regarding programming at the centers, and the San Francisco 
Art Commission responsible for developing policy regarding the use of the facilities" 
the wording being seen as unclear and needing clarification. 

Regarding the format of the transition, Ellison Wong explained how she has requested 
Anne Marie Theilen to be present at meetings so that the Neighborhood Arts Program 
transfer of staff could be implemented to start June 1 instead of July 1; and that 
Alfonso Maciel had agreed to work the month of June and the month of July part-time 
to make the staff transition as smooth as possible. All the Commissioners agreed 
that this format of transition would be helpful. 

A new concept for the Neighborhood Arts Program Consortium was introduced by Theilen. 
This concept would reintroduce the "South of Market Cultural Center" in the NAP 
Consortium. It was suggested by Maciel that a change from "the Friends of Support 
Services for the Arts" to "the South of Market Cultural Center" would clarify the 
programming issue since it would leave- as suggested by the staff- the Support Service 
under the sponsorship of the Neighborhood Arts Program. 

Maciel also explained how the prospectus for funding the four cultural centers would 
be a better package for the consideration of prospective Funders. 

Chairman Petri asked if "The Friends of the Support Services for the Arts" could 
decide on this issue before the round table meeting of February 2k. He felt that 
developing the NAP and the NAP Consortium is important, and that this should be 
addressed in first place on the calendar of reports at round table meeting. 
Ellison Wong said that she would see to revising the calendar. Maciel , being 
asked if members of the NAP Consortium Board could be asked to come to the next 
round table meeting, expressed the hope that a committee could be called to assess 
the new Neighborhood Arts Consortium format. 

There being no further business, meeting adjourned at 1 1 : 30 AM 
(Minutes of NAP Committee meeting were taken by Anne Marie Theilen) 
AMT:mh 



3 1223 07086 3106 




A7C50 

*H St Ouh C- ^ 



Bs&Bl Neighborhood Arts Program 






<>-» La>wUMENTS DEPT. 



NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM C0M4ITTEE April 18, 1964 J UN 4 1984 

SAN FKANCISCO 
PUBLIC ' IRPAPV 

PRESENT: Commissioners: Duncan, Nemerovski 

Staff: Anne-Marie Theilen, Bernice Bing, Oscar Maciel, Zerama Meacham, 
Fe Bongolan 
Guests: Oddie Palmer (President / AREPO) , Heinz Ludke (President, FSSA) 

FACILITIES REPORT 

Anne-Marie reported on the successful opening of the Western Addition Cultural Center of 
April 7th, which included the premier of a new play at the Buriel Clay Theater and an 
opening reception for painter Kemit Amenophis at the Sargent Johnson Gallery. The parking 
lot has been cleared, and the building is open for public use. 

The Mission Cultural Center staff, Architect Richard Broder, and the City Inspector will 
be neeting with Anne-Marie at the Mission CC on renovation plans and use of the facility 
during renovation. 

Staff reported on safety hazards at the lot adjacent to the South of Market Cultural Center. 
This office is following through with correspondence to the Greyhound Corp. , owners of the 
property. 

COMMITTEE UPDATE 

Commissioner Duncan asked that there be clarification on the title of this Committee. He 
made a recommendation that the Committee be referred to as the NAP Committee, and that 
Cultural Facilities can be a special meeting or subcommittee of this Committee. 

CULTURAL FACILITIES AGREEMENTS 

Additional input from City Attorney .Judy Teichman on the agreements between the Arts Commis- 
sion and the non-profit boards of the Cultural Centers necessitated a change in the format 
of the agreements to be re-drafted as memorandums of understanding between the two parties. 
New drafts were distributed to staff and board presidents present. These new drafts are to 
go to each respective board for review and finalization before the next Committee mtg., 5/16. 
Anne-Marie distributed the NAP report tbat detailed the needs for the memorandum of under- 
standing expressed by Judy Teichman. These are as follows: 1) A Policy Manual; 2) A Person- 
nel Policy; 3) A schedule of donations and fees; 4) Guidelines for services; 5) Copy of 
liaibility insurance contracts. 

Heinz Ludke, President of FSSA, presented a letter to NAP Committee members, NAP Director, 
and copies to Claire Isaacs, which included questions on the guidelines of transfer and 
distribution of funds, and a list of staff to be transferred to the non-profit boards. 

Anne-Marie distributed a list of NAP staff to be transferred to each non-profit board's 
payroll. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




FUNDING 

With the assistance of Jackie Nemerovski, contact has been made with the Hewlett- 
Packard Foundation who will fund the program up to $25,000 for administrative and 
programming support in the performing arts. Anne and Fe scheduled a series of in- 
formation coordination meetings for the preparation of these proposals. 

The Zellerbach Family Fund awarded $4,500 to each Cultural Center for the Program 
Directors salary and $2,000 for the salary of the NAC Fiscal Manager. The proosals 
to ARCO will be completed before the end of the month. 



fnb 




If 

April 26, 1984 

ADDENDUM TO: Cultural Facilities Committee Report 

We propose a resolution to accept the gift of $50,000 from the Friends of the 
Arts for the salaries and programming support of the Neighborhood Arts Program. 



COMMISSIONERS: 



fnb 



Aye No 



Duncan, Timothy 
Nemerovski, Jackie ^^J 
Paterson, William 
LaRocca, Robert p^L/Si.* 
Taliaferro, Ray 



7* 




Neighborhood Arts Program 



A*70,50 



CY>uAu^^l 



Present: 



NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM COMMITTEE 



June 20, 1984 



Commissioner William Patcrson 

Staff: Anne-Marie Theilen, Fe Bongolan 

CC Staff: Bernice Bing, Oscar Maciel, Zemma Meacham 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

JUL 9 1984 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1) NAP BUDGET 1984-85 

Anne-Marie Theilen reported on the projected budget for the NAP for 
next fiscal year. The main source of income for next year will be 
from the Ad Valorem and Hotel Tax funds. These funds will cover the 
maintenance of the cultural facilities, salaries of 3 NAP adminis- 
trative positions (NAP Director; Assistant; CCC Program Coordinator). 
NAP is asking POA to fundraise $23,000 for neighborhood projects and 
regranting funds to underserved communities and community groups not 
served by NAP over the last four years. This FY monies allocated for 
Neighborhood Projects were used to pay expenses of the four CC's. 
The budget will need to be presented to the next NAP committee. 
BVOH Program Director raised concerns about the discretionary alloca- 
tion for past year budget for the Bayview Opera House. 

2) NAP COMMITTEE NEETINGS 84-85 

If no commissioners from the NAP Committee object, NAP Committee 
meetings could remain the same -- third Wednesday of each month, 
9 a.m. , 45 Hyde Street Conference Room. NAP staff will be taking a 
phone poll of the NAP Committee to get input on the scheduling of 
meetings. 

3) ROUND TABLE MEETING - NAP 

The month of September has been set aside for the scheduling of a 
special Round Table meeting of the Arts Commission, pending approval 
from a phone poll, to meet on the future programming of the Neighbor- 
hoods Arts Program for FY 84-85. 

4) OTHER BUSINESS 

Bernice Bing asked that an introduction of the new Program Director 
of the South of Market Cultural Center be placed on the agenda of the 
July 9th Arts Commission meeting. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




Neighborhood Arts Program Committee Page 2 

June 20, 1984 



5) ATTACHMENTS TO AGREEMENTS 

The NAP office still requires attachments requested (personnel policies, 
programming guidelines, donations; fees guidelines; programming plan 
Lor 1984-85). 

Oscar stated that it has been difficult to develop a programming plan 
due to the renovation. 

Anne-Marie suggested that a meetings between Arts Commissioner La Rocca 
(in place of Dmitri Vedensky, who is leaving on vacation during this 
time), Dick Broder, MCC staff, and Director and herself take place soon. 
NAP office will coordinate and schedule this meeting. 

The deadline for the submission of attachments is set for Monday, July 2, 
1984. 

6) CULTURAL CENTERS FACILITIES REPORT 

WACC: The bid for Phase II renovation of the Western Adddition Cultural 
Center has been approved. Work will begin in October 

SOMAR: The proposed expenditure for structural rehabilitation of 
$563,000 was modified and approved by the Bureau of Architecture. The 
reconstruction will begin in March. 







Neighborhood Arts Program 



NAP COMMITTEE - AUGUST 15, 1984 



Commiss ioners: 
Staff: 



Cultural Center 
Representatives: 



Timothy Duncan 

Arts Commission Director Claire Isaacs, Anne-Marie 
Theilen, Julie Cheung, Fe Bongolan 

Zemma Meacham, Oscar Maciel, James Kjorvestad, 
Lenny Mc Bride (ill) 



1. NAP BUDGET 84-85 

Anne-Marie Theilen distributed copes of the NAP Budget for 84-85. 
Question were raised on the line-item for equipment purchase ($3,996). 
This money will be spent on purchasing equipment for the Bayview Opera 
House, to be completely expended by December 1984. 

Cultural Center Directors also raised questions about the money from 
the FOA Allocations Committee designated for the NAP and the Cultural 
Centers. James Kjorvestad asked why the money allocated to NAP 
($5,000) was not in this budget, since it did occur this new F.Y. 
This change was noted by the staff. 

Zemma Meacham requested that the money she expended for BOH involve- 
ment in the Arts Festival be reimbursed to her as soon as possible. 
$600 of this money went to an all-day satel 1 i te festival ; $410 went 
to a Youth Arts Tour. 

2. NAP PROGRAM PLAN 84-85 

Anne-Marie introduced the general outline for NAP's Program Plan of 
1984-85. This program would include: 

a) Facilities Maintenance & Renovation 

b) Technical Assistance to Arts Organizations and Artists 

c) Neighborhood Projects 

d) Assist SLP in the Artist live/Work issue 

e) Survey of Children's Programs in Neighborhoods for Resource 
Information 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




NAP Committee N 

August 15, 198^ 
Page 2. 

a) Facilities maintenance/ renovation -- Beginning this year, meetings 
with Dick Broder and contractor have facilitated program relocation 
within the Cultural Centers and WACC's Phase II renovation will 
begin September 1. MCC's Phase II renovation will begin October Isl 
as planned, and SOMAR's Phase I in the spring, 1985- 

A system of numbered invoices is being used now for repairs of the 
CC's through DPW. This system has been more effective than in 
recent years in terms of response to repair requests. 

b) Technical assistance to arts organizations and artists — Due to 
popular demand, we will be re-issuing new editions of " How to 
Manipulate the Media" and " Basic Grants Writing" , both are NAP 
publ i cat ions . 

As part of its daily office routine, the NAP provides referrals 
available to artists in funding, arts facilities, and arts pro- 
grams throughout the City. We plan to continue this service to 
the community this year. 

c) Neighborhood Projects — Four "Neighborhood Rhythms" projects 
are planned in under-served ares of the City. These festivals 
will include performances by prominent San Francisco groups and 
individuals, as well as draw upon the talents of individuals 
from the respective neighborhoods. 

It was suggested that these neighborhood festivals be planned 
with a presentation at next year's Arts Festival. Director 
Isaacs and Commissioner Duncan asked about planning activities 
in the Tenderloin. 

Fe said facilities could be a problem, but perhaps we could 
pursue the YMCA as a possible programming space. 

Commissioner Duncan also suggested Glide Church and Hospitality 
House as other possible venues for programming. 

e) Survey of Children's Programs — Commissioner Duncan reported this 
has been done to some extent by SLP. James Kjorvestad suggested 
that a special article in 'California Living' could cover this 
resource guide. 

3. FACILITIES UPDATE 

Renovation on the WACC and MCC are to begin again. MCC's Phase II 
is on-schedule and alternative spaces are being looked at for the 
Mission's programs. Mis ion Grafica, its print-and-des ign component, 
has special space needs, and Anne-Marie presented a list of alterna- 
tive spaces for it and other MCC programs. Since the Facility Manager 
position will be laid off in October, money for that position can be 
used to offset any space rental costs. 



NAP Committee 
August 15, 198^ 
Page 3. 



k. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING 

Anne-Marie commented that addi tonal materials for the MOU's, 
requested by the City Attorney, are due to NAP by September 1st. 
Additionally, decisions on monitoring these MOU's need to be made. 

Commissioner Duncan suggested that an outline be prepared on what 
MOU issues need monitoring. 



NEW BUSINESS — NAP Committee 

Because of the nature and variety of business of the NAP Committee's 
agenda, it was recommended that all Directors and Coordinators of 
NAP-aff i 1 iated programs attend this meeting. 

A new format for monthly reporting was developed for all the CC's 
that includes a facilities maintenance/repair report, monthly 
activities, and attendance, and user statistics. These forms are 
to be submitted monthly at the NAP Committee meeting. 



/c 




g&la Neighborhood Arts Frogra 



CULTURAL CENTER M ONTH 19_ 

PROGRAM ACTIVITY: (Please fill out completely)* 

ACTIVITY (name and type of event ) DATE(S) AUDIENCE # ** 



* Please attach 5 copies of program brochures, flyers, and other promotional materials used 

for these classes and events. 
** Please attach completed statistical forms from the preceeding month. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 





Neighborhood Arts Program 



CULTURAL CENTER 



MONTH 



19 



FACILITIES REPORT - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
REPAIRS NEEDED LOCATION IN BUILDING 



DATE CALLED OR REQUESTED 



REPAIRS COMPLETED 



LOCATION IN BUILDING 



DATE COMPLETED 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 





Neighborhood Arts Progra 



PROGRAM PLAN FY 1984-85 

I. CULTURAL CENTERS RENOVATION AND MAINTENANCE . 

A. NAP Director facilitates completion of Master Plan renovation on the Mission, Wes- 
tern Addition and South of Market Cultural Centers throughout 1984-85. This respon- 
sibility includes: 

1) Liaison with City-contracted architect and City Inspector in overseeing 
renovation process. 

2) Liaison with Department of City Planning to further completion of renovation 
phases. 

3) Liaison with Cultural Center staff to coordinate programming space during 
renovation. 

B. NAP staff facilitates repair and maintenance of the four Cultural Centers through 
the following: 

1) Updating of requests for building repair. 

2) Liaison with Department of Public Works to complete repairs on cultural 
facilities. 

II. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO ARTS ORGANIZATIONS AND ARTISTS . 

A. Development, publication and distribution of inexpensive resource materials for 
artists and arts organizations. These will include: 

1) " How to Manipulate the Media " a resource guide on inexpensive and innovative 
methods to promote arts and community events. 

2) " Basic Grants Writing " a layman's guide introducing the fundamental aspects 
of writing successful fundraising proposals - for artists and emerging arts 
groups . 

B. Act as general resource and information office on: 

1) arts funding sources 

2) community-accessible arts facilities 

3) specific arts classes, programs, workshops city-wide 

4) referrals for direct arts support 

III. NEIGHBORHOOD PROJECTS 

A. Planning, coordination and production of community arts programs in under served 
areas of SF. The areas targeted are: 

1) Visitation Valley /Excelsior district 

2) Lake Merced/Parkside/Twin Peaks 

3) Ingleside/Bernal Heights/Glen Park 

4) North Beach/Chinatown 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




The projects planned are; 

1) "Neighborhood Rhythms" - four day-long community arts festivals utilizing 
the talents of San Francisco and local community performing artists. 

(funds for this project are being applied to through the Inter-Arts and 
Expansion Arts Programs of the National Endowment for the Arts) 

2) Neighborhood visual arts projects - coordination of four arts projects 
planned in conjunction with the "Neighborhood Rhythms" concert ' series . 

(funding for this project through Ad Valorem. Request to FoA for supplementary 
budget) 

B. Planning, coordination and curating showcase of San Francisco's California Arts 
Council Artists-in-Residence. Locations to be announced. (See attached list for 
artists) 

(funds for this project are being applied to through the California Arts 
Council) 

IV. ASSIST STATE/LOCAL PARTNERSHIP IN ARTIST LIVE/WORK ISSUE . (See attached report) 

V. SURVEY OF CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS IN NEIGHBORHOODS FOR RESOURCE PUBLICATION. 




Neighborhood Arts Program 



NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM PLAN - BUDGET 

Development, publication, and distribution of inexpensive resource materials for 
emerging artists and arts organization, which will include: 

1) "How to Manipulate the Media" — a resource guide on inexpensive and innova- 
tive methods to promote arts and community events, 

2) "Basic Grants Wri ting" — a layman's guide introcuding the fundamental aspects 
of successful fundraising proposals for artists and emerging arts groups. 

3) "Sources and Resources for the Visual Artist" -- guide/ resource manual for the 
emerging visual artist - an aid to "breaking in" to the visual arts field. 

Consultancy, Printing, Postage, 1) $700 

Layout (1,000 copies) 2) 600 

3) 550 

$1 > 85 ° 

Planning, coordination, and production of community arts programs in underserved 
areas of San Francisco. Targeted areas: Visitation Valley/Excelsior; Tenderloin; 
Ingleside/Bernal Heights/Glen Park; and, North Beach/Chinatown. 

1) "Neighborhood Rhythms" — A day-long community arts festivals, utilizing the 
talents of San Francisco and local community performing artists. 

2) Neighborhood Visual Arts Projects — coordination of h arts projects, planned 
in conjunction with "Neighborhood Rhythms" concert series. 

Coordinator, Performing Arts ($6,500) ) 

Coordinator, Visual Arts ($3,500) } $10,000 

Performers Honoraria ($1,500 per project x *♦) 6,000 

Equipment/Supplies ($1,000 per project x k) ^,000 

Publicity 650 

$20,650 

Survey of children's projects in neighborhoods as resource publication 
Consultancy, Printing, Postage, Layout $1,500 

$1,500 



TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET $24,000 

|0ME 
Ad Valorem $2,000 

Hotel Tax $2,000 

$4,000 

JEST FROM CONSOLIDATED FUNDRAISING $20,000 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 





A70.50 ^ DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

**f. §>P Cl(M Ccyy-<^uLMccvu - OCT 3 11984 

SAN 1- RAN CI SCO 

Neighborhood Arts Program 

NAP COMMITTEE MEETING - OCTOBER 17, 1984 C~Y)'t< J J 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Robert LaRocca, Jacqueline Nemerovski 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Zemma Meacham, James Kjorvestad, Oscar Maciel, Lenny McBride 

STAFF: Claire Isaacs, Anne-Marie Theilen, Julie Cheung 

CHAIR: Robert LaRocca 

PROGRAM DIRECTORS ' REPORT : (See Director's report) a verbal report from Oscar Maciel 
explained that he had no staff available to do reports. A position has been posted and 
interviews were in process, but the salary was too low. On programming, Oscar explained 
that the dance and visual arts programs were housed at 362 Capp Street, and that the cen- 
ter was negotiating for a space to be rented at 454 Shotwell for graphics and film/media 
classes. Oscar mentioned that the Arts Commission would not be expected to pay for the 
total costs. Discussion took place on the facilities manager's salary to be used for ren- 
tal costs and on the fact that the Arts Commission needed to be part of the negotiation 
when public monies are to be used. Oscar requested to hold a sale of furniture (file cabi- 
nets, desks, etc.) The inventory is either public property or owned by the Center. Claire 
replied that the city requested that all city properties are to be returned to the ware- 
house for disposal. Her recommendation was to either store at Pier 70 or make it available 
to other centers anything that could be used in the future (furniture, equipment) . 

FACILITIES MAINTENANCE : A list of maintenance needs developed for' FY 84^85 by Cultural Cen- 
ter staff was distributed. There were comments on the presence of rats and water from the 
east side of the building at the Bayview Opera House. Another request dealt with a continu- 
ing prblem with the water fountain. 

FUNDING REPORT : A long discussion took place on cash flow problems for the Cultural Centers 
from October, November and December. There were comments made about the lack of understan- 
ding on the allocation process, spplication, and Friends of the Arts not sharing enough 
information on the fundraising efforts now in progress. Claire mentioned that after a meet- 
ing with John Kreidler, she would make the recommendation that the Neighborhood Arts Consor- 
tium continue to coordinate their application to the San Francisco Foundation. Claire also 
reported that fundraising events funding had not been distributed because it was unclear 
at this time of how much was raised. Claire also spoke of the Gallery wanting to apply for 
funding and how to best work as a clearinghouse. Everyone present was questioning these 
issues, and it was a consensus that a special meeting was needed to reaffirm priorities 
and focus on how to best deal with a shortfall. It was said over and over by the Program 
Directors that it was important for them to be informed on the fundraising planning process, 
so that they would know when and where they would seek funding independently. 

PRAISES AND THANKS : From Arts Commission staff to Ernie Rivera for the installation of 
sound equipment at the Tot Lot event in Chinatown &f rom Julie Cheung for the almost-free 
stage installation for the Hop Jok Fair. 

ROUND TABLE MEETING : After reading the proposed agenda, comments were made as to the intent 
of the meeting, the audience attending, and the hope that it would be a positive and infor- 
mative meeting. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




City and County of San Francisco 



Arts Commission 




SP 



AX, 50 



Commissioners 



Roselyne C. Swig 
President 

Dmitri Vedensky, Jr. 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Timothy Duncan 

William Gaylord 
Jo Hanson 
Robert LaRocca 
Jacqueline Nemerovski 
William Paterson 
Piero Patri 
Peter Rodriguez 
Ray Taliaferro 

Ex Officio Members: 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museums 
Library Commission 
Planning Commission 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



Dianne Feinstein 
MAYOR 



ROUNDTABLE MEETING ON THE NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 

MINUTES 
23 October 1984 
San Francisco Ballet 
455 Franklin Street 
San Francisco, California 
3:20 p.m. 



Claire N. Isaacs 
DIRECTOR 



COMMISSIONERS PRESENT : 
Roselyne C. Swig, President 
Dmitri Vedensky, Vice President 
William Gaylord 
Jo Hanson 
Robert LaRocca 
Jacqueline Nemerovski 
Ray Taliaferro 



DOCUMENTS DEPi 

MOV 1 3 1984 

SAW FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC f IPRAPY 



OTHERS PRESENT : 

Claire Isaacs, Director 

Michael Bell 

Anne Marie Theilen 

Fe Bongolan 

Jill Manton 

John McCarron 

Mary Killion 

Kathryn Reasoner 

Meg Madden 

James Kvorjestad 

Oscar Maciel 

Zemma Meacham 

James McDuffie 

Ron Gallegos 

Peter Gallegos 

Diane David 

Kathy Brew' 

Kris Getz 

Tracy Schafer 

Richard Reineccius 

Tony Schaefer 

Michelle Schaeffer 

Indra Mungal 

Susan Cervantes 

Dierdra Carrigan 

Sam Rafaat 

Patricia Kidd 

In the absence of the Neighborhood Arts Program Committee Chair, Timothy Duncan, Commission 
Ray Taliaferro called the meeting to order and introduced all Commissioners present. He 
requested others present to introduce themselves. After introductions, Commissioner 
Taliaferro requested Director Claire Isaacs to make an opening statement. 

The Director stated her pleasure at being associated with the Neighborhood Arts Program, 
a nationally renowned program that has been the model for being accessible to underserved 
populations and neighborhoods. The past year, she continued, has brought about an impor- 
tant transition; the Neighborhood Cultural Centers' Boards are funding their staffs, which 
are no longer on City payrolls. She affirmed that the Commission is taking deep and 
continued interest, and through the Friends of the Arts and the consolidated funding prograr 
have committed to support this program. 



(415) 550-3463 



46 HYDE STREET - ROOM 319 



SAN FRANCISCO, 94102 



Minute s(23 October 1984) -2- ARTS COMMISSION 

ROUNDTABLK MEETING 

The Director of the Neighborhood Arts Program, Anne Marie Theilen reported on .the 
three transitional stages that have effected the cultural centers: 1) the Cultural 
Centers' staff are now employed by the non-profit Boards; 2) the Memorandum of Under- 
standing between the cultural centers and the Arts Commission, that determines the roles 
and responsibilities of these partnerships and, 3) the renovation program development. 
Ms. Theilen then directed the meeting's attention to the organizational charts displayed, 
that reflected the relationship between the public and non-profit sectors and she briefly 
described how the funds are generated and allocated. She gave the history of the 
acquisition of properties that were converted into cultural centers, and for the leases and 
renovation projects of other neighborhood community and cultural facilities and their 
equipment. 

Special Projects 

Ms. Bongolan, Assistant to the Director of the Neighborhood Arts Program, presented slides 
of the program's special projects. The 1984 Arts Festival had five NAP octogons that 
housed art of participating artists from each cultural center that included students' work 
demonstrations and a California Arts Council artists-in-residence showcase that was exhibit 
in the Polk and Larkin Halls. Ms. Bongolan reported that the main intent of showcasing 
the CAC artist-in-residence work was to inform the public and give exposure to these art Lsl 

New Programs 

Ms. Bongolan stated that new programs will be a continuation of the past seventeen years 
to enhance the cultural centers' activities and to work to further define programs. The 
main concerns, she continued, are the consolidation of municipal administration of the 
Cultural Centers and assisting implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding with the 
Cultural Centers' non-profit Boards and to centralize direct services to the community, 
especially to the emerging artists and artist groups. Increased demand for NAP publi- 
cations has impelled the program to begin to update, reprint and distribute the following 
pamphlets: 1) How To Manipulate Media ; 2) Basic Grants Writing ; 3) Sources and Resources . 

The Arts Festival exhibit was limited in so far as exposure for the artist-in residence, 
and artist feedback has created the following suggestions: 1) more showcase time, exhibit 
time, and publicity at the festival; 2) a special exhibit at the Arts Commission Gallery; 
3) a resource map of CAC classes to be distributed city wide. 

Another special project in the planning is a children's map of alternative cultural program; 
for after school activity to be distributed through the schools and especially targeted 
for "latch-key children." A similar format will also be used for the CAC artists, 
advertising classes with schedules, times and locations. In conclusion, Ms. Bongolan 
requested arts organizations represented to lend their cooperation and assistance in the 
development of these resource maps. 

Discussion 

Commissioner Taliaferro presented a brief report on the history of the cultural centers' 
lease agreements and defined their sources of funding. He explained that with the 
inception of national revenue sharing, San Francisco was allocated funding and that it had 
been proposed that one million per year for five years was to be taken out of revenue 
sharing for the development of Davies Symphony Hall. Community groups then were concerned 
that none of this money would go to the neighborhoods. Arts groups protested and a com- 
promise resulted in which five million would go to Davies and two and a half million would 
go to the communities to develop community cultural centers. As a result, the Arts Commissi 
received $500,000 per year over a five-year period. In four of the neighborhoods it be- 
came evident that purchase of the facilities was necessary and this brought about the 
purchase of the Western ADdition Cultural Center, Mission Cultural Center, the South of 
Market Cultural Center and the Bayview Opera House. The Bayview Opera 'House which was 
the first in the City to be taken under the wing of the Department of Planning, 






.M i n u L c s (23 October I 984 ) -J- ARTS COMMISSION 

ROUNDTABLE MEETING 

was declared a historical building and received renovation funds from the U.S. Dept. 
of Interior. To complete the transfer of property to the Arts Commission, the re- 
maining $162,000 from the renovation funds were used for the purchase of this property. 
The pre-paid lease program, explained Commissioner Taliaferro, was created to facilitate 
using city funds for non-city owned property and ten facilities have been impacted by 
the initial two-and-half million dollars. Some of these included: Hospitality House, 
The Chinese Cultural Center, Precita Center, Intersection, Potrero Hill Neighborhood 
House and 326 Capp/Mission Center. Mr. Bruce Davis inquired what results when a lease 
is terminated. Commissioner Taliaferro responded that the Arts Commission responsibility 
is terminated and the facility is cognizant, and in agreement with the arrangement. 

Commissioner Nemerovski inquired if within existing resources and guidelines, will other 
direct cultural services be available to other neighborhoods. Ms. Bongolan responded 
that researching the constituency ± s now underway for the Visitacion Valley., Tenderloin, 
Chinatown and North Beach, and Ingleside/Oceanview Areas. Commissioner Nemerovski aiso 
inquired if NAP is aware of the art resource book that State/Local is working on. Ms. 
Theilen responded affirmatively and stated that NAP is willing to work with the Stale/ 
Local. Commissioner Nemerovski invited Meg Madden, Chair of the State/Local Advisory 
Board to report on that topic. 

Ms. Madden stated that she recently met with area superintendent, Tom Sammon of the 
San Francisco Unified School District to discuss publication of an arts program 
resource pamphlet for teachers as a guide to be used for arts education. Ms. Theilen, 
again explained and described to the meeting of the need for publication of definite 
and set after school cultural activities for children. She reiterated her request I'or 
support and assistance in the publication of a children's resource map. In response to 
Commissioner Hanson's inquiry, Ms. Theilen said that she and the staff scruitnize re- 
sources for children by consulting with the Department of Parks and Recreation regarding 
their resources, and consulting the constiuency they currently; reliable statistics have 
been gathered from the Neighborhood Cultural Centers of how and whom are served. 
Commission President Swig interjected that United Way is another source for reliable 
statistical information. Mr. Ron Gallegos volunteered information and possible contacts 
for the NAP staff to investigate for resource information regarding the publication of 
this children's resource map. Commissioner Gaylord inquired if the visitors and Con- 
vention bureau have the existing mural resource map. Ms. Theilen replied affirmatively 
and voiced her concern that sufficient funds remain for the continued printing of this 
resource map. Commissioner Hanson inquired if possibly the Visitors and Convention Bureau 
could contribute towards printing expenses. Mr. Kjorvestad replied that Publicity and 
Advertising Fund from the Hotel Tax Office provide funding and that funding was available 
for a reprint. 

Mission Cultural Center 

In response to Commissioner Taliaferro's inquiry, Director, Oscar Maciel reported that 
the Mission Cultural Center has been closed since September 30th and that eighteen classes 
have been transferred to 362 Capp Street, and that to date the general office and graphic 
services have not been relocated. Regarding the renovation program at the Mission Cultural 
Center, Anne Marie Theilen and Oscar Maciel reported that special problems exist due to 
the intense work to be done at the Center and that more funds will be needed to complete 
the restoration of the second-fllpr space and the elevator. 

South of Market Cultural Center 

Mr. Jim Kvorjestad, Director of the South of Market Cultural Center reported to the meeting 
that SOMAR is open and the Gallery and theatre are booked through February, 1985. He 
stated that it's his hope the Center will not be closed when renovation begins in May, 1985. 
President Swig inquired if after Phase I of the renovation, would the gallery and theatre 
accommodate larger groups. Commissioner Vedensky and Director Isaacs responded no; Phase I 
is concerned with only structural renovation (roof and foundation). 



M i 11 u i v h (25 Oclobor 1984) -t\- AUTS COMMISSION 

ROUNDTABLE MEETING 



Western Additon Cultural Center 

• 

Commissioner Taliaferro inquired as to what remains to be renovated after Phase II of 
the renovation is complete. Ms. Theilen reported that funding will be needed for the 
remaining 25% which is a new third-fllor dance floor, workshop space and music rooms. 
Mr. McDuffie, President of the Western Additon Cultural Center voiced his concerns on 
behalf of dance organizations in the building. Ten to fifteen thousand dollars was 
quoted as the price of this new dance floor. 

Discussion 

Commissioner Taliaferro stated that people must be informed of the importance of the 
cultural centers in order to maintain public support. The Neighborhood Arts Program 
was borne out of political controversy and pressure, and sustaining these programs is 
accomplished by keeping the public informed on how these facilities enhance and enrich 
their lives in San Francisco neighborhoods. Mr. Reineccius inquired about the long-range 
plans for more cultural centers. President Swig replied that when the existing facilities 
are completed there may be the opportunity to expand programs. Recently, she announced, 
at an informal meeting with the Hotel Tax Fund office, there was discussion on the 
possibility for NAP expansion of programs and that this office is interested in a possible 
out-reach program to the underserved communities. 

President Swig continued, say that, perhaps networking services, as there was prior to 
Proposition 13, may be better than acquiring more real estate. Kathryn Reasoner inter- 
jected that the Arts Commisson's recent involvement with other City Departments on the 
Fire Code Booklet and the artists live/work issues, is bring/ awareness to others, of 
the special programs' facilities of the cultural centers. Mr. Gallegos replying to the 
President's statements said that the Cultural Centers do serve people from other neighbor- 
hoods and his feeling was that focus should be on the completion of the renovation and 
stated he has considerations about cultural art centers' role in after school childrens' 
orograms. Director Isaacs responded that consideration must be given to the needs of the 
artists, adults and children. If artists have no live/work space, San Francisco will 
lose them; if the children are not served, the future is jeoprodized. The long-range 
goal of renovation is currently the priority and the future is for innovative and 
creative programming. In the meantime, she continued, the NAP, which is not administering 
the buildings, per se, is free to develop programs in other parts of the City, and to 
raise public consciousness. Ms. Isaacs stated her hope is that existing facilities be 
used as models and training centers for those in other neighborhoods and communities. 
Commissioner Nemerovski suggested that perhaps on a long-range basis, the Cultural Centers 
could investigate generating money by charging for their services on those other programs 
with other neighborhoods. 

President Swig reported to the meeting that the Arts Commission is on the brink of something 
very special as far as precedent-setting for our community and other communities in the 
nation. The live-work issue and securing all city departments cooperation in discussing 
changes for code policies for the artists are important. If the downtown plan is success- 
ful in raising the consciousness of the developers, as far as arts exhibit spaces, this 
too will be a remarakable achievement to the Arts Commission credit. The NAP, she contin- 
ued, could do a job as far as networking, and they would receive a great deal of interest 
from the City in hte public and private sectors, if they really reached out to other 
neighborhoods. She stated that one thing she would like to see happen is for all success- 
ful cultural planning of activities, NAP and the Cultural Centers could create and generate 
revenue and that, in turn, the arts community would not be so pressed to make money. 
Commissioner Hanson agreed and stated she considers finding budget for public relations and 
using City Hall for showcasing neighborhood arts exhibitions, two priorities. A lengthy 
discussion ensued on the developers and city codes and permits and the necessity to eliminate 
the red-tape to facilitate new buildings with spaces for art. 



N i n u t e s (23 October 1984) -5- „. ARTS COMMISSION 

ROUNDTABLE MEETING 

— — ——————— — —_ ___ 

Returning to the subject of the Neighborhood Cultural Centers, Commissioner Gaylord 
inquired how the public learns of the activities at the Cultural Centers. Ms. Theilen 
responded that informational packets are available at City Hall and the Visitors and 
Convention Bureau. President Swig suggested to augment these ways of advertising, 
perhaps the public utilities companies could include a brochure in their billing invoice 
' envelopes, to new customers. Some of the public utility administrators are on the 
Business Committee for the Arts, she continued, and they can be consulted regarding this 
idea. 

Susan Cervantes, Director of Precita Eyes Muralists, asked for suggestions of how money 
is raised to maintain and provide programs and, she inquired if there was some way her 
program could tie-in to one of the Neighborhood Cultural Centers. Commissioner Taliaferro 
responded that originally this could be done; but now neighborhood leaders and fund- 
raising groups and non-profit boards work together, collectively, to raise* funds for 
programming and staff. 

In conclusion, Commissioner Taliaferro suggested that another meeting be planned for 
the Cultural Centers' Directors, Board Members and the Friends of the Arts groups to 
further discuss needs and to clarify ways and means for the Cultural Centers to assist 
other art groups. He thanked all for attending and stated that his desire was that some- 
day the City would look on the Cultural Centers as they do some of the Department ol 
Recreation and Parks facilities that are non-revenue producing, i.e., swimming pools, 
tennis courts, and parks. The Cultural Centers, he stated, "are a very integral part 
of our overall quality of live and development and existance in this community; this is 
what makes San Francisco so very special." 

Commissioner Nemerovski acknowledged the staff for the afternoon's presentation. 

Adjournment 5:00 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted: 




Claire N. Isaacs 

Director of Cultural Affairs 




»SCQ 

APV 



sf 

A"70. S"D uwiiUMIEWTS ©SPY, 

1-?b-4Z • I EB 14 1985 

Him Neighborhood Arts Program 

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM COMMITTEE MEETING - January 16, 1985 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Duncan, Nemerovsky, LaRocca 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Isaacs, Bongolan, Cheung 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Meacham, Kjorvestad, McBride Absent: Maciel (ill). 

FACILITIES UPDATE: Fe Bongolan reported on the status of the Western Addition Cultural 
Center's renovation, which is 90% completed, with work almost finished on the third floor. 
Contact was made with the Bureau of Energy Conservation who recommended through a case 
study various means to save on lighting and heating costs. Since work will be done by DPW 
to restore heating and ventilation system, BBC will be working on installing energy-effi- 
cient lighting in the building in spring of 1986. 

The Mission Cultural Center drawings are still waiting thei approval for a building permit. 
Drawings have been brought to the Fire Department for their review and appraisal. 

The South of Market drawings are almost complete. A meeting has been scheduled for the 
24th of January between Director James Kjorvestad, Dick Broder and NAP staff to discuss 
the finished drawings and update staff on the plans. 

BUILDING MANAGER: Director Isaacs explained the mechanics and coordination required in getting 
building managers for the maintenance of the cultural centers in the city budget. Cultural 
center Directors have been working with Ms. Isaacs to develop the job description of this 
position. Support from the cultural centers community non-profit boards may be needed in the 
near future to get these positions through and into the budget for next year. 

MOU REVIEW: After review of the attachments to the MOU, City Attorney Judy Teichman found 
them to be well thought out, individual to the specific needs of the cultural centers, The 
next phase of the review process can now proceed with the review meetings between the Arts 
Commission and the non-profit boards over the memorandum. Commissioner Duncan, Claire, Fe/ 
Anne-Marie will be attending these meetings scheduled as follows: 



FSSA 


January 30 


6pm 


FMCC 


February 4 


6:30pm 


FWACC 


February 13 


6pm 


AREPO 


February 11 


6pm 



James Kjorvestad raised a question as to why the meetings could not take place all at once. 
Director Isaacs clarified that these meetings are specified to the particular needs of each 
cultural center, which may vary from site to site, and issues raised would be far less con- 
fused if dealt with on an individual basis. Commissioner Duncan requested that a specific 
agenda be drafted for Commission and non-profit board review. Fe suggested that this could 
be done in memo .form, and that the premise of these meetings was to clarify and affirm the 
partnership relationship entrusting these non-profit boards with the programming of the 
cultural facilities. Lenny McBride suggested that it would also be a good time for both 
parties to make addendums, additions or changes to the MOU. 

HOTEL TAX FUND APPLICATION - NAP: Fe presented the outline draft of the budget for the NAP's 
Hotel Tax Fund grant, (85-86) . The following allocations were discussed: 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




NAP COMMITTEE - January 16, 1985 (cont'd ) 

1) Cultural Center allocation $34,792 . 

This amount would cover phone costs (including leasing and services) , murals insurance, 
truck maintenance, alarm/ security systems - all fixed costs that need to be administered 
by the Arts Commission for the cultural centers. 

2) Chinatown Neighborhood Arts Program - $21,597. 

This amount covers the salary and benefits costs for a permanent full-time civil service 
position at the Chinese Cultural Center to provide community arts programming. A discre- 
tionary account of $2,000. has been included in this figure for publicity and documenta- 
tion, materials and supplies. 

3) Underserved Communities - $22,500 . ♦ 

This amount covers the costs of four half-time salaries for arts coordinators to work - 
in the Visitation Valley and Tenderloin area, to develop arts classes and events. In- 
cluded also are costs for technical equipment/assistance, graphics and publicity, materi- 
als and supplies, and production costs. 

4) San Francisco County Jail Re-Entry Project - $10,000 . A portion of 
this amount covers costs for the coordination and production of a play produced and 
performed by ex-offenders. Workshops and production will be coordinated by Shabaka. 
The remaining portion will cover the costs for mounting and displaying a group exhibit 
of works by ex-offenders that will travel to local universities (SFSU, SFAI, USF, UCSF) . 
This exhibition will be curated by Enrique Chagoya. 

A question was raised about the budget coordination between the NAC and NAP for this appli- 
cation by James Kjorvestad. Director Isaacs clarified that this budget process has been 
well in place for a number of years, and that the special projects have been planned for 
a number of months, with centers' staff being given the input that these plans were in ef- 
fect. A concern was raised about the attention to special projects in other areas by Lenny 
McBride, who felt that input from the Program Directors should have been asked for to make 
this project more cost-effective. Commissioner Nemerovsky stated that since this still is in 
the planning and development stage with the submission of a budget to HTF, that the coor- 
dination can be dealt with at a later date. 

A request was made for a recommendation to approve the NAP Hotel Tax Application. Recommen- 
dation was made to approve the NAP application to HTF by Commissioner Nemerovsky. 

This recommendation was seconded by Conmissioner Duncan, and approved by the Committee mem- 
bers present. 

meeting adjourned 1:15pm 

FNB 




A70.5O sfaj-&™*^u^ . 

MiWl Neighborhood Arts Program 

MINUTES OF THE NAP COMMITTEE MEETING - April 17, 1985 

"S^' DOCI 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Commissioner La Rocca 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Isaacs, Cheung 
CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: James Kjorvestad, Zemma Meacham 

MOU: NAP Director Theilen reported on the latest developments on the MOU review procedure — 
the Mission Cultural Center has received a second draft, which has been reviewed by the 
City Attorney. Due to the relocation of MCC's programs, the Mission Cultural Center's MOU 
requires a different type of contract structure. Arts Commission Director Isaacs under- 
scored the importance of these MOU's with the Program Directors present, citing the Wilkes- 
Bashford/Parking Authority case as the crux of the concern by the Board of Supervisors 
on the management of city-owned facilities. 

FACILITIES: A meeting between Arts Commission Director, NAP Director, Commissioner Dmitri 
Vedensky, and the MCC staff and board representatives has been scheduled to discuss and 
clarify concerns and issues on MCC programs during renovation, and on the renovation it- 
self. Bidding amounts for the reconstruction of the MCC have far exceeded the total amount 
encumbered by the city for this project. 

A concern was raised by SOMAR DirectorJames Kjorvestad about the possibility of running 
out of future capital improvement funds to renovate SOMAR, in light of the new developments 
about MCC's renovation. Isaacs reassured him that the funds for each project are kept 
separate. Theilen went on to say that the code work on the MCC will remain the chief pri- 
ority, and that the preceeding plans and changes suggested by MCC staff should be deferred 
until a subsequent phase. 

A new development concerning Arts Commission facilities on Turk and Fillmore streets was 
discussed. The Power Station, built by the Fire Department is currently under the Arts 
Commission's jurisdiction. Proposals for use of the building have been sent by a Black 
cultural organization and and Asian design services organization. The Police Department 
wants-to use the land to build a Northern and Park station. Director Isaacs felt it was 
in the Arts Commission's interest to keep the property for community use. Commission La 
Rocca suggested getting a letter of recommendation fro#*ithe Landmark' Board of the City 
Planning Department, and an informal assessment of the building's structure by the City 
Building Inspector. 

FUNDING: Theilen reminded the Program Directors that a fiscal plan for the next fiscal 
year is needed from the cultural centers to be given to the NAP Committee. The Committee 
will need to know how the cultural centers plan to get support in order to better under- 
stand and eventually help coordinate fundraising efforts with the Arts Commission Finance 
Committee. Isaacs invited the Program Directors to attend the next meeting of the Finance/ 
Allocations Committee meeting, Wednesday, May 1st at 4pm. 



fnb 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 





A70.50 



ggggl Neighborhood Arts Program 



NAP COMMITTEE MINUTES - JANUARY 16, 19 86 



DOCUMENTS DERT. 



COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Duncan, LaRocca 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan, Isaacs AN 2 3 1986 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Byrd 



FACILITIES 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Renovation - the final coat of paint for the doors in the Western Addition 
Cultural Center is still pending. This will complete the renovation for the 
building. 

The renovation for the Mission Cultural Center is proceeding on schedule. 
Once code work is completed, the first priority project to be done will be 
the stage platform and platforms for seating on the first floor (theater 
area), and leveling of the floors on the 2nd and 3rd floor areas. The second 
priority is carpeting of the seating platform and the building lobby area. 
The third priority is to install seating in the theater area. If no additional 
costs are needed to be spent on basic code work for the building, the chances 
for contingency funding for this renovation to complete all three priorities 
are good. 

Space to re-locate programs of the South of Market Cultural Center/Support 
Services continues to be in question. A request to the Fire Department was 
made late and other city agencies may need to be consulted for space use. 
Commissioner LaRocca suggested that the pier along the Embarcadero could 
be a possibility, and that the Ports Commission should be contacted. The 
warehouse spaces there could probably accomodate what the Support Services 
need in terms of office space and truck parking. 

Maintenance - the present status of the maintenance budget can handle small 
repair jobs for the cultural centers - minor carpentry, repairs in leaks 
in plumbing pipes, etc., however, a larger percentage of the repairs for 
the cultural centers are involving the use of capital improvement funds - 
because these repairs are actually replacing entire building systems (e.g. 
removing asbestos lining from the plumbing at WACC , re-locating the dark- 
room on SOMAR's first floor, the painting of the south wall on the Mission 
Cultural Center, and west wall at WACC) . Staff anticipates running out of 
regular maintenance funds before the end of the calendar year. 

PROGRAMMING REPORTS 

WACC - Charles Byrd reported on the present activities at WACC, including 
the upcoming month-long activities for Black History Month in February. 

Commission Duncan asked about the present status of the Advisory Committee 
for WACC. Anne reported that there are now guidelines for election of board 
members. A question was raised as to who would vote for these board members, 
and there is some pressure by Supervisors Ward and Kennedy to have the elec- 
tion soon, and to represent that specific neighborhood. 

Commissioner Duncan recommended that the Commission should send a letter 
to the Advisory group, requesting that the write to the NAP Committee to 
ask for the Commission's recognition as the advisory group for the WACC, 
and that the Commission and they would agree upon a date (30-90 days) to 
coordinate and complete an election of board members for the Center. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




SPECIAL PROJECTS 

Written progress reports from the Visitation Valley, Tenderloin, and County 
Jail programs who have been funded by the NAP Hotel Tax Fund grant for this 
fiscal year were submitted for the Commissioners review. The Visitation 
Valley project is now underway, while efforts to reach the Southeast Asian 
community by the Tenderloin Arts Project is being coordinated. Commissioner 
Duncan expressed an interest in attending the exhibition of artworks by 
County Jail inmates when it begin touring, and Commissioner LaRocca was 
interested in the Tenderloin Arts Festival that will occur in the spring 
at Boeddecker Park. 

NAP - HOTEL TAX FUND APPLICATION 

The budget for next year's Hotel Tax Fund application was presented for 
Committee review. (See attached) . The line item for contracted costs for 
maintenance and other facility needs for the cultural centers has increased 
by $5,000. due to the added costs of installing a new security system for 
the Mission Cultural Center once it is re-opened, and increased costs for 
the elevator maintenance of the WACC passenger elevator. Costs have also 
increased for truck maintenance (Support Services) and sewer maintenance 
for all buildings, as well as insurance for murals. Total allocation: $30 , 297 . 

Copies of the budget will be sent to all Program Directors of the Cultural 
Centers. Commissioner Duncan recommended that the budget be presented to 
the Finance Committee on the 27th of January for their approval. 

The grant amounts for the Visitation Valley, Tenderloin, and Sheriff's 
Department will remain the same as for this fiscal year. A request has been 
added for the Potrero Hill children and adults visual arts program for a 
CAC Artist-in-Residence match and supplies. Chinatown NAP will be increased 
by $6,000 to cover the costs of a permanent Civil Service mandated salary 
increase, and money for supplies and exhibition costs. 




A70.SD 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

AUG 1 1986 



SCO 
ARY 



HSU Neighborhood Arts Prolan* 

MINUTES OF THE NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 7/17/86 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Paterson, Eichelbaum, Rockrise 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Byrd, Kjorvestad, Maciel, McKenzie 

FACILITIES MAINTENANCE: Bongolan reported on the maintenance procedures for 
the cultural centers, including the allocation of funds, delegation of duties 
for repairs, and the differentiation between maintenance funds for building 
repair, done through the Department of Public Works Bureau of Building Repair, 
the budget for capital improvement, and renovation funds. 

Commissioner Rockrise requested information on the maintenance procedures, 
how the work gets prioritized, how funds get allocated for certain jobs, and 
how the Arts Commission compares what has been done on their list of repairs 
for the year with DPW's list. He recommended that the Program Directors pro- 
vide the lists to the Arts Commission to initiate this process, and asked staff 
if that lias been done. Staff stated that this process is already in place. Com. 
Rockrise asked for further information on how these lists compared to DPW's 
tasks. Staff will make this information available. 

FACILITIES RENOVATION: Theilen reported on the contract which was developed 
for Dick Broder to develop a re-entry plan for the Mission Cultural Center. 
Copies of the contract were distributed for review. 

A further delay in the opening of the site may be caused by the necessity 
to replace the 4" sprinkler main for the building with a 6" one. Com. Rock- 
rise asked who made that recommendation, Theilen replied the Fire Department. 
Rockrise recommended that a letter from the architect go out to the Fire Depart- 
ment to clarify the situation. Theilen replied that the letter is being sent, 
and the architect has clarified that the installation of the 4" main was ap- 
proved in the previous renovation phase by the Fire Department. Com. Rockrise 
expressed concern about this correspondence being successful with the Fire 
Department, and asked if additional support from the Arts Commission will be 
needed. Theilen answered that it wasn't necessary yet. 

The contractor repaired a 'leak in the gas line, which is over and above the 
contractor's responsibility, at an estimated $5,000. There is presently $8,000 
In contingency. This money should also be used for carpeting, and flooring, 
vhich are the second and third priorities. The sprinkler main is first priority. 

Maciel raised a question about the contractor's restoration of the flooring 
Dack to match existing floors. Com. Rockrise asked if this was in the base bid. 
4aciel answered yes. Rockrise added that he went over with Broder about the 
.looring, and it is estimated that $60,000 extra would be needed for the new 
: ]oor, base boards only. Maciel stated that the contract specifications showed 
.he flooring would match existing flooring. Com. Rockrise requested Theilen 
-o get further information from Broder as to whether or not this flooring job 
.s base or extra. 

Theilen raised the issue about getting funding for supplementary costs. There 
s some money available from the cultural center purchase appropriation. At 
he completion of WACC ' s renovation, $14,000 that was remaining was transferred 
o Mission. In FY 81/82 $35,000 which was designated for repair of SOMAR's roof 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 (I 




NAP COMMITTEE 7/17/86 page 2 

remained unused to this date because money is available to replace the entire 
roof during Phase I renovation at the center. SOMAR Director J. Kjorvestad 
expressed concern that this information wasn't shared earlier. Theilen stated 
that it was, and also that the Arts Commission was keeping this amount there 
for extra for renovation. Commissioner Rockrise asked that staff provide re- 
gular status reports on renovation funds and activity. Theilen stated that this 
was already being done and will continue to proceed with the reports on reno- 
vation to staff. 

Maciel reported that with the growing interest of performing artists to do- 
nate appearances for the special opening events for the Mission Cultural Cen- 
ter, particularly Joan Baez and Carlos Santana , the media needs to know when 
the building will be opened up, and when staff can move in. Maciel expressed 
his concern that when he attended the Finance Committee meeting, he heard from 
Broder that if the electrical system is not replaced that no piece of equipment 
could be plugged in. He asked if this was true. Com. Rockrise stated that he 
asked Broder to separate the needs listing, with the list to show the electri- 
cal needs if there was a graphics studio only, while the printing gets "jobbed 
out" to other contractors. Therefore, staff could wait to move in the printing 
aspect of Mission Grafica until Phase III funds are available to complete reno- 
vation nnd allow for the elctrical needs of the print shop machinery. 

Maciel expressed his concern that the Mission Grafica is the only silkscreen 
service in the city, and if they do not continue their printing, city-wide needs 
are not met. He also stated that Mission Grafica is raising enough funds to 
sustain itself and can contribute up to 25% of its own income to sustain other 
programs of the center. 

Com. Rockrise requested that Broder get the layout of the system which sup- 
ports the graphics area. He also stated that if there is no money for this elec- 
trical work that the center could still be open, and that was the main i 
concern of the Arts Commission, also that the installation of the printing shop 
could wait until the allocation for Phase III comes through and work is comple- 
ted . 

Maciel suggested the installation of a 200 amp system at the Osage Alley 
side of the bui.ding specifically for Mission Grafica, which would suit their 
needs, be a separate service on a different meter, Com. Rockrise suggested that 
this proposal be brought to Broder for feasibility. Theilen agreed and would 
talk to Broder about it. 

Com. Eichelbaum raised a concern about the move of the graphics studio into 
the 4th floor, which is unfinished, and not accessible to by the freight eleva- 
tor. Maciel clarified that all of Mission Grafica' s equipment can go through 
regular-sized doors. He re-iterated his concern about the cost-effectiveness 
of keeping Mission Grafica at another site, paying $1600 per month in rent. 
He again asked for the new date of opening for public information. 

GUIDELINES FOR USE OF PUBLIC FACILITIES: Theilen distributed copies of guide- 
lines for use of the neighborhood cultural centers to Commissioners and staff. 
The guidelines need to be updated, and Commissioner Paterson saw the need for 
the document to state the role of the Neighborhood Arts consortium and the non- 
profit boards. 

CULTURAL CENTER FISCAL REPORTS - LOAN REQUESTS: Com. Paterson referred to the 
report made by the Consortium on July 9th. J. Kjorvestad, also secretary to the 
Consortium, presented a revised copy of the request dated 7/16/86, in response 
to the Commission's request through NAP to receive fiscal information. Com. 
Rockrise saw the need for written reports to be presented to Commissioners one 
week in advance of the meeting. Com. Paterson clarified that the Centers were 
asking for grants/loans during the interim period before Hotel Tax money is 
made available to the ce-ters . Commissioner Rockrise suggested that the pro- 



*AP COMMITTEE 7/17/86 P a 9 e 3 

:e dure for getting information to the Commissioners before their discussion 
>.t Committee meetings should be reviewed and improved. He suggested that the 
uaterials be made available to Commissioners 3 days in advance. Theilen ex- 
pressed concern about this method, because of staff shortages in some centers. 
Com. Rockrise suggested that the materials could be mailed directly to the 
:ommissioners. Theilen stated that the information should go to NAP Committee 
nembers and the NAP office. 

Commissioner Eichelbaum reviewed the 7/16/86 loan request and asked if this 
/as for all the centers. Kjorvestad clarified that memo reflected the needs of 
;he centers, and that this loan request is to assist in adjusting the cash flow 
situation at the centers during this lull period in Hotel Tax funding, to be 
)aid back when Hotel Tax Funds come in. 

Com. Paterson stated that this needed to go to the Finance Committee, but 
annot be reviewed today. He asked for the additional information requested 
>rior to the meeting - income and dispursement , and justification as to the 
shortfall per center. Kjorvestad responded that if it cannot be reviewed today, 
:here will be no need to ask the NAP Committee at all. If it comes in September, 
:he shortfall could be covered soon afterward. Com. Rockrise asked if this 
leant the cultural centers should request this assistance > sooner. Maciel re- 
sponded that the budgets vary from center to center, and that one of the wren- 
ches in the mechanism for funding was that the SF Foundation money is due to 
:ome in eight weeks, and in the meantime, cash flow would be tight. Theilen 
idded that the SF Foundation money only addresses the needs of two of the cul- 
tural centers. Kjorvestad responded that this wasn't known at the time of the 
ipplication, when all four were applied for through the Consortium. 

The discussion continued about the presentation of this item to the Finance 
Committee. It was recommended that the fiscal information from all four centers 
Ls needed in order to have an appropriate recommendation from the Finance Com- 
mittee. Commissioner Rockrise stated a motion: 

MOTION: That the cultural centers forward their loan requests to the 
Finance Committee of the Arts Commission, with the back-up materials 
requested by the NAP (Second - Eichelbaum) MOTION PASSED. 

laciel raised an issue also dealing with the Finance Committee regarding the 
>6,000 given by the Arts Commission to the Mission Cultural Center for re-entry. 
le requested to make a petition to the Arts Commission to use these funds for 
>perations, instead of using the funds for re-entry costs such as painting or 
ight construction. Maciel added that he could get a letter of donation from 
Jiampolini Bros. Co. for $5,000 in paint and painting supplies. 

Theilen stated that the item of the $5,000 from the Arts Commission to the 
'MCC still needs to be reviewed by the Finance Committee. Com. Paterson asked 
rhere the money is now. Maciel stated that it is in a bank account. 

!om. Paterson moved to adjourn. 2nd. Passed. Meeting adjourned 5:20pm. 

SEE ATTACHED - GUIDELINES FOR NAP COMMITTEE MEETINGS) 



GUIDELINES FOR NAP COMMITTEE MEETINGS ( As discussed in 7.17.86 
meeting ) . 

1. A copy of the program reports developed by the Program Directors 
or other staff from the cultural centers should be mailed to the 
NAP Committee commissioners _5 days before the NAP Committee meeting 

2. Specific agenda items that are your concerns need to be presented 
as specific issues inwriting and mailed to the Commissioners and 
NAP office _5 days before the meeting. 

If there is no written fact sheet on the issues that you wish 
to have discussed at the NAP Committee meeting, this will delay the 
Commissioners discussion of your item. 



NAP COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

Com. William Paterson, Chair 

Com. Robert LaRocca 

Com. Peter Rodriguez 

Com. Stanley Eichelbaum 

Com. George Rockrise 




A-70.CD 

**■ -7lie/fU> SfJ-U^L DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

Neighborhood Arts Program 

PUBLIC Ll^kA RV 

MINUTES - NAP COMMITTEE (Special Meeting 7/28/86) 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Paterson, LaRocca, Rockrise, Eichelbaum 
ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan, LaRocca 
CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Kjorvestad, Byrd 

AGENDA: I. RECOMMENDATION ON ARTS COMMISSION LOAN TO CULTURAL CENTERS 

II. RECOMMENDATION ON NAP APPLICATION TO SF FOUNDATION FOR WESTERN 
ADDITION CULTURAL CENTER AND BAYVIEW OPERA HOUSE. 

I. RECOMMENDATION ON ARTS COMMISSION LOAN TO CULTURAL CENTERS 

Commissioner Paterson reported on the status of the requested information coming 
in from the cultural centers prior to this meeting, which included income, ex- 
penses and justification as to the shortfall and the necessity of a loan. James 
Kjorvestad of SOMAR distributed copies of his materisls, which showed the cash 
flow for the quarter the requested loan would cover, and also distributed copies 
of the operations budget for SOMAR/SSA. 

Kjorvestad stated the need for his center is because of the shortage of 
cash funding for the first quarter of the new fiscal year, until October when 
Hotel Tax Funds become available. He stated that support service revenue assists 
in easing some of the month to month expenses. Questions were raised about the 
truck costs. It was clarified that the costs for truck maintenance were admini- 
stered through the city. 

Commissioner Paterson stated that there would only be three requests for 
loans, instead of four, because Mission Cultural Center has no loan request 
for this meeting and withdrew its request of the 7/17 meeting to change the 
use of the $5,000 from re-entry to administration. 

The remaining reports were distributed. In summary, the total amounts needed 
by the cultural centers were: SOMAR/SSA - $22,500; Bayview Opera House - $5,000; 
Western Addition Cultural Center $5,500. The cultural centers requested a loan 
of $15,000 to offset the total need of $33,000. Remaining funds would be sought 
through the Arts Loan Fund* and an advance through the Hotel Tax Fund. 

Commissioner Rockrise recommended that the budgets for all four centers be 
consolidated into one format. There was a discussion as to the Commission's 
policy on the cultural center fundraising as a group (through the Consortium) , 
and the need to develop other policies for fiscal management. 

After review of fiscal reports from the cultural centers, the motion was 
stated: That the NAP Committee recommends that the Arts Commission loan $15,000 
to be divided evenly between the three centers requesting: South of Market, 
Western Addition CC, and Bayview Opera House. Second: LaRocca. Motion passed. 

II. NAP APPLICATION TO SF FOUNDATION FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO BOARDS OF 
W.A.C.C. AND BAYVIEW OPERA HOUSE. 

Theilen presented copies of the NAP grant application request which will go to 
the Finance Committee for review. The request is to apply for $5,000 in techni- 
cal assistance through the SF Foundation for WACC and Bayview boards. A brief 
discussion occurred over the consultant proposed (Gordon Braithwaite) . The mo- 
tion was stated: That the NAP Committee approves the grant application request 
by NAP to SF Foundation for technical assistance to WACC and Bayview. Second: 
Eichelbaum. Motion passed. 
MEETING ADJOURNED: 2:55pm 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 





SP 
A70, 50 



DOCUMENTO DgPT. 

SEP 8 1936 



ig&ia Neighborhood Arts Program 



NAP COMMITTEE MEETING - August 21, 1986 



COMMISSIONERS PRESENT 
ARTS COMMISSION STAFF 
CULTURAL CENTER STAFF 



Paterson, Eichelbaum, LaRocca, Rodriguez, Rockrise 
Theilen, Bongolan, Cheung 
Maciel, Byrd, McKenzie 



PROGRAMMING REPORT - CHINATOWN NAP : Chinatown NAP Coordinator Julie Cheung 
reported on the upcoming exhibition of 27 artists showing both traditional 
and contemporary works. A reception for the exhibit will take place 9/12/86 
4: 30-6: 30pm at the Chinese Culture Center. 

Julie also announced the awarding of a CAC Artist-in-Residence grant to 
Stephen Wong, to conduct classes in silkscreen at the center. His project will 
begin in October. 

FACILITIES - Renovation : Theilen reported on the difficulty in the installa- 
tion of the fire sprinklering system at the South of Market Cultural Center. 
A letter from Dick Broder clarifying the situation resolved the problem. 

A visit by Commissioner Rockrise for orientation on the buildings and their 
renovation was very helpful. Theilen also reported on the funding to date re- 
maining for Phase I of the South of Market Cultural Center. Of the $563,300 
allocated for Phase I, $39,403 remains. The $379,559 spent was for additional 
(contingency costs, inspection, administration, testing and designing. Walls 
are needed to be built after Phase I is completed. A plan from the FSSA on 
the walls to partition the area will be needed. 

Commissioner Rockrise asked if the SOMAR Program Director, working with the 
architect, could have a plan ready for the next meeting of the NAP Committee. 
Theilen responded that there is presently a Master Plan with a cost estimate. 
Com. Rockrise felt this was sufficient for a reference to use for any plan that 
would be devised. 

Theilen reported on the current status of the Mission Cultural Center. There 
is a delay caused by the problem of having the gas meter re-installed. Apparen- 
tly, PGand E is having difficulty locating it. PG and E has agreed, however, to 
install the meter. Another delay has occurred because of the gas leaks in the 
ouilding. Theilen reported that with the repair of the two leaking lines and 
second inspection of the building, that the Commission is hoping for an opening 
|Df the building in two weeks . 

Maciel requested a copy of the letter sent by Broder (8/15/86) to PG and E 
about the gas meter. It was asked whether there is any hot water in the buil- 
lling. Maciel stated there is a 30-gallon hot water heater installed in the buil- 
ding by staff. Theilen clarified that there was a water heater in the building. 
Commissioner Rockrise requested that an estimate be done on the installation of 
i hot water heater that will accomodate the entire building. 

Theilen reported that Broder is asking for a programming plan in writing 
'(letter dated 7/22/86). Maciel stated that he found it difficult to meet with 
':he architect at the NAP office and that Broder needed to see the scope of the 
ICC equipment. Maciel stated that there was a rationale for additional improve- 
lents for MCC submitted to Broder. Further discussion about the number of meet- 
.ngs and location led to the recommendation that a meeting take place at the 
|:enter. Maciel stated that he did get an estimate from JB Contractors for in- 
stallation of a bathroom on the second floor, and that he was trying to get 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




page 2 



other contractors to the site. He reminded the Commissioners that according 
to the MOU, the estimating for facilities renovation should be the Arts Com- 
mission's responsibility. Com. Rockrise re-stated his recommendation that 
Broder and Maciel schedule a meeting, or there would be no verification on 
the estimates that are being done. 

Maintenance : Fe reported on the current status of facilities maintenance for 
the centers. A follow-up report (dated 7/29) was sent to the Bureau of Buil- 
ding Repair after NAP met with BBR's new director about maintenance jobs that 
still need to be completed for 1985-86. These jobs need to have the funds that 
were allocated for 85-86 jobbed out and completed. A new list which will list 
repairs over and above the lists submitted for last year was requested from 
the Program Directors to be completed and submitted to the October NAP Commit- 
tee meeting. 

Clarification was asked on the capital improvements list, which was distri- 
buted to the Commissioners and cultural center staff. Of the four requests sub- 
mitted, only two were approved for 1985-86. These were for re-fitting the 
plumbing at the Western Addition, and sealing and re-painting of the western 
wall of WACC. The other requests, which were for the re-painting of the Osage 
Alley wall of the Mission Cultural Center and the installation of new plumbing 
for the SOMAR, will need to be re-submitted for 86-87. All requests will be 
going to the Department of City Planning for recommendation and implementation 
by the Bureau of Building Repairs. 

Maciel asked if the capital improvement funds could be used for the floor 
repair work at the Mission Cultural Center. Theilen reminded Maciel that three 
contingency items in renovation funding account for that project. In line aheac 
;of the flooring comes 1) installation of the gas meter, 2) installation of car- 
peting on the first floor, and then the floor work. She reminded him that the 
$35,000 available for this work has been transferred. It was clarified to Macie 
that the capital improvements budget is for repair or improvement of existing 
facilities outside of renovation work, not for renovation itself. 

Com. Rockrise raised a question about the estimate for the flooring ($50,000 
to $60,000). Theilen responded that when given that estimate, the total floorin 
area was provided for the estimate, and not the total specific area that needed 
repair. Maciel asked if this would prevent the center from re-opening. Theilen 
replied that if this couldn't be done by the present contractor, that it could 
also be done by another contractor, which could delay the project's completion. 

Com. Rodriguez asked if this could be done through the Bureau of Building 
Repairs, with a statement to them that this was an emergency situation. Theilen 

I "clarified that that would be for areas that were already being used by the pub- 
lic and considered unsafe. 

Maciel stated that he preferred the funding go to the 3rd floor instead of 
the 2nd floor because there would be insufficient electricity to run the galler 
therefore, there wouldn't be a gallery. Theilen stated that Broder said the gallery was 
operated before without electrical renovation. Maciel stated that he needed a 
letter from the Arts Commission to clarify this. 

Com. Paterson asked for clarification from Theilen as to whether or not 
Broder was supposed to provide some electrical feasibility report with the 
additional $5,000 contract from the Arts Commission for the MCC Re-entry plan. 
Theilen stated yes, but that he is still needing the programming report to 
omplete this. 

Maciel asked the Commission for an authorizationto pursue the electrical 
tfork for the MCC to be done by an independent contractor. 



page 3 



Maciel stated that he called PG and E and found that they had no objection 
to installing a separate line for the center, but that the PG and E represen- 
tative stated that the NAP Office said they couldn't. Rockrise clarified that 
if the usage of the electrical power would be a common usage, then there shoulc 
be only one meter, he also noted that the Mission Grafica department would 
overload this present system. 

Maciel suggested that since it has been estimated that $100,000 would be 
needed to replace the electrical service and update it at the MCC, then a sepa- 
rate meter could be installed until the Commission finds other renovation funds 
to adapt the electrical power of the building. Commissioner LaRocca asked if 
it was legal for a private organization to install a separate meter in a city 
owned building. Theilen clarified that a feasibility study should be done first 
then a letter from Dick Broder requesting authorization for a separate service 
in a public facility. Com. Rockrise added that this must be approved by the 
Arts Commission. 

Theilen stated that there is presently no funding from the Arts Commission 
to install the meter at the price estimated ($5,000). Com. Rockrise asked Macie 
if he could get the $5,000 to install the meter. Maciel stated that he could. 
Theilen stated that this would need to be clarified. Com. LaRocca agreed. Com. 
Rockrise stated the motion: 

"That the MCC be authorized to expend $5,000 of its own funds to install a 
temporary meter according to city and county codes." Motion seconded. Motion 
carried. 

PROGRAM DIRECTORS' REPORT : Maciel reported on the Carlos Santana event, in 
which the MCC will receive $15,000 from the sponsor . He also asked for the 
courtesy of approving the minutes of the NAP Committee, because of a letter 
written by Claire Isaacs to the Cowell Foundation about the $100,000 to be 
granted to the Mission Cultural Center (addressed to S. Spivey, Cowell Founda- 
tion's Executive Director). 

Com. Paterson stated that the comments Maciel made in reference to this 
grant were made at a public meeting. Maciel stated that it was improper for 
the Commission to write to a funding source without contacting the MCC. He 
clarified that the request was made to the President of the Cowell Foundation, 
and that this procedure, he has found, was the best way to have approval for 
funding. 

Com. LaRocca re-iterated that the statement was made at a public meeting, 
and Theilen added that Isaacs was responding to the fact that if the FMCC did 
not have a multi-year MOU with the Commission, that the Cowell Foundation would 
not fund the MCC, as stated to the Arts Commission at its public meeting at 
the Mission Recreation Center in April. 

Charles Byrd briefly reported on the success of the Reggae event sponsored 
by WACC at Pier Two. 1400 people attended and an estimated $4,000 was raised 
for the center. 

flEW BUSINESS : Com. Paterson reported on the new letter from Loretta Kruger of 
the FMCC requesting arbitration from the Bay Area Lawyers for the Arts on the 
Memorandum of Understanding. He recommended that the NAP Committee should make 
a. statement to the full Commission that the FoMCC MOU should be signed. He 
also reported on the issues that were raised in previous correspondence by 
<ruger that that Arts Commission already feels is resolved. He stated that the 
Commission President feels some resolution from this Committee needs to be 



page 4 

passed in regards to this issue. 

Commissioner Rodriguez asked for further clarification on the insurance 
issue. Does insurance need to be carried by a private non-profit organization 
to run a public building? It was stated the City Risk Manager requested that 
general liability insurance be carried and attached to the MOU by the boards. 

Maciel stated that the FMCC main problem is that further clarification is 
needed and beneficial for the FMCC, and that the Arts Commission should take 
the heed from the Audit Report drafted by the City Controller's Office. He sta- 
ted that many points in the MOU are not enforceable, and clarification was 
needed on the NAC * s role with the FMCC. He also stated that the auditor recom- 
mended a contract be negotiated between the Arts Commission and FMCC. 

Com. Paterson asked if the present MOU could be amended, or if there was 
anything specifically in the language that speaks to the possibility of amend- 
ment. Theilen responded that this was put into the draft and pulled. Com. Rock- 
rise asked if the Commission has signed off on the MOU, and recommended to 
Maciel that if his board is not in agreement with it, then it should be sent 
back in writing to the Commission. 

Theilen reminded the Commissioners that there have been negotiation meetings 
and three different changes in the MOU. She presented the current draft as 
was negotiated between the Arts Commission and FMCC. Com. Rodriguez asked 
about the concern regarding the personnel policy of FMCC and the personnel 
stipulation in the MOU. It was clarified that the city has concerns about this 
issue because of past experience where the city and county became liable for 
the employees of the non-profit board of the cultural center when that board 
was asked to leave and its MOU with the city terminated. Theilen clarified 
that the primary issue is the multi-year MOU, and that the City Attorney did 
not recommend it. Maciel stated that the City Attorney informed the MCC, that 
she had no objection to the MOU being multi-year. Theilen responded that the 
City Attorney did not recommend a multi-year MOU or a contract yet, and that 
the MOU's are working towards the development of a contract. 

Maciel cited the example of the War Memorial Board in regards to developing 
;a multi-year contract. Com. Rockrise stated that the relationship of the 
Arts Commission to the FMCC through the MOU is the city as a landlord, and 
that there is a limitation as to the city's liability. Com. Rodriguez suggested 
to Maciel that the FMCC Board sign the current MOU provided there are provision 
tito make amendments. Theilen further clarified that the amendments should not 
mean an interim situation takes place while amendments are being negotiated. 

The Commissioners reviewed the MOU final draft. Maciel stated that the 
FMCC does accept the Commission's position on the need to have a year-to-year 
MOU. Com. Rockrise stated that the FMCC needs to send back its response in 
•writing, with fewer objections, and Com. Paterson stated the motion: 

"That the NAP Committee recommends that the MOU with the FMCC as it now 
stands, be signed by the Commission." Motion seconded and carried. 

Com. Paterson stated that the next Commission meeting is September 8 and 
that the FMCC should respond prior to that meeting. 

neeting adjourned 5:45pm 
Enb 




A70.50 



* 



H- 



■ liiia, S£ i jXj-b Cfyv-yu. 



§&8s Neighborhood Arts Program 



NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 12/18/86 MINUTE 



DOCUMENTS Dept. 



COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Paterson, Eichelbaum 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Isaacs, Theilen, Bongolan JAN 5 1987 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Byrd, Kjorvestad, Maciel s 

GUESTS: Lou Harris (President - SoWACC) p ^Lic ubpaov 

MOU REPORT: Theilen reported that the compliance meeting for the Mission Cultural Center 
MOU (FMCC) will take place January 8 at the Arts Commission. %he meeting will be to see that 
the MOU is working and that the relationship works for both parties. It will need a Commis- 
sioner to attend. Commissioner Paterson stated that he will be able to attend. 

The SOMAR MOU (FSSA) will not require a compliance meeting. A meeting working towards 
an MOU with the Supporters of WACC took place 12/17/86 and was very successful. Theilen 
added that the SWACC MOU should be discussed by the NAP Committee at its January meeting, 
working towards the Commission's finalization of the partnership in February. 

Commissioner Eichelbaum requested clarification on the difference between the MOU and a 
contract. Theilen replied that a .contract would have the Board of Supervisor's involvement. 

MAINTENANCE: Theilen distributed the 1986-87 maintenance report. Fe added that the report in- 
cludes both regular maintenance projects, which would expend the annual maintenance budget, 
land capitol improvement projects which are executed by Bureau of Building Repair with special 
^project funds designated by City Planning. 

Kjorvestad raised concern over the report not including SOMAR' s glazing needs, which were 
..Extensive. NAP staff re-assured cultural center directors that if there were any needs not 
nentioned in this report, that they should be called into the NAP office as soon as possible, 
:3o that when NAP meets with Paul Moran of Bureau of Building Repair, which should be in the 
aext month, these needs would be included. 

IENOVATION: Theilen reported on the status of the South of Market Cultural Center's renovation. 
lit present, there" is an estimate of what the new partitions are going to cost . ($81, 000. ) . Left 
ytver so far from Phase I is $39,000. The contingency leftover to date is $15,000., making a 

Ivotal of $54,000 possibly available to do the partitioning project. 
Kjorvestad added that the $81,000 was Broder's estimate, and that the contractor could settle 
n an amount much lower than estimated. 

Theilen reported on the present situation of the defective doors at the Western Addition 
ultural Center. Estimates will be received from the Department of Public Works for door repair 
r replacement, where applicable. Theilen also added that with the nature of some of the bull- 
ing maintenance repairs becoming so expensive, it is building up a good justification for 
xtra funding for maintenance and capitol improvement for the cultural centers. 

Theilen reported that the Mission Cultural Center's renovation completion is still delayed, 
ne Fire Inspector wants more exit lights installed. The estimates and the work will be done 
Lthin the week. 

Isaacs reported that it has been difficult for the staff to get center open, and that the 
:ts Commission does not have control over how long the renovation will take. She added that 
)th the NAP office and the Arts Commission has been under incredible pressure to get the 
ssion Cultural Center open. Because of pressure, the Arts Commission worked intensively 
• get staff into the building for its opening in October. She also raised concern over the 
ability issue of having staff in the building while the building has not been turned over to 
He city, and that MCC staff had been doing repairs to the building while preliminary inspec- 
on of the construction work is still taking place, making it very difficult for the building 
spector to designate areas of the contractor's responsibility in finishing the job. She 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




NAP COMMITTEE 12/18/86 page 2 

reported that staff was let in for an event 10/19, and the Commission proceeded on obtaining 
a permit for a one-day special use permit for that day. 

Isaacs added that on December 1, 1986, Oscar Maciel called to state that he had a problem. 
He had scheduled the building for a special event for children on December 5th. He asked that 
if there was a permit for use of the building on October 19th, why wasn't there any coverage 
for December 5th. Isaacs stated that she did alot of research, and on that week (December 1-5) 
both she and Anne Theilen worked full time on getting a special permit for the event on 12/5. 
Issacs went on to ask Maciel not to schedule any more events unntil the building had been handed 
back to the city. She expressed a deep concern over the fact that two posters were placed on the 
doors on the Mission Street side of the Mission Cultural Center, asking that those members of 
the public who were interested in the literary presentation and class, and now could not go 
because the MCC staff had to move the programs should express their dissatisfaction with 
Claire Isaacs and Anne-Marie Theilen of the Arts Commission. Isaacs felt that these posters 
were raising a grave concern on her part about the partnerhip between the Commission and the 
Mission Cultural Center, and were a breach of that partnership. She went on to state that the 
Arts Commission did not cancel those events or classes, and that it was the MCC's responsibility 
to call and notify the Commission of these events in good time, especially now that the building 
is not officially open. Isaacs also raised concern that Teatro de la Esperanza has been 
scheduled to use the center in January and February. 

Maciel responded by requesting to see the permit for use of the center on October 19. He also 
stated that he contacted the Fire Insepction Bureau, who told him that there was no use permit 
for MCC on file for that date. Isaacs stated that that was because the event was cancelled and 
therefore no permit was necessary. She added that it was Maciel himself who told Commissioners 
at the December meeting of the Commission that the Fire Marshall had given MCC the go-ahead to 
use the center for the 12/5 event. Maciel stated that that would have been illogical for him 
to make that statement at an Arts Commission meeting. He added that he was told by Arts Com- 
mission staff that the first floor was accepted by the Commission. Theilen responded that the 
Commission was working towards this. Isaacs added that the building is not completed yet, and 
re-iterated her request for MCC staff not to schedule the building until this phase of the 
work is completed. Maciel stated that he could no longer work with Commission staff, both 
Isaacs and Theilen, and added that he had tried to obtain insurance for the center but because 
the building was not up to code yet, insurance companies could not cover MCC. He asked why 
the staff of MCC was given the keys to the building in the first place. Theilen responded that 
the staff was given access to the building so that they could go in and begin to develop archi- 
tectural plans for future renovation. Theilen also added that there seems to be little left to 
lo to complete the project. 

Commissioner Paterson asked Maciel about the event of 12/5. Maciel reported that 350 chil- 
Iren attended and Supervisor Jim Gonzales, as well as School Superintendent Rosario Anaya made 
ippearances. Maciel again stated his concern over why staff was given keys to the center and re- 
'orted that he found the front door of the center open three times in the last week. Theilen 
sked why this wasn't reported to the Arts Commission immediately. 

OUND TABLE MEETING: Isaacs reported that there will be a Round Table meeting on the NAP on 
naury 26, 1987 to discuss the Neighborhood Arts Program in-depth and brief all Commissioners 
ully on what is happening with the program beyond the cultural centers. Dhe also added that 
his is what Commissioner Nemerovski asked, based on discussion of NAP's long-range goals. 

ROGRAM REPORTS - CULTURAL CENTERS: Byrd reported on highlights of WACC's programming for the 
Dnth, including a. special perfomance by the U-Zulu Dance Theatyer of South Africa, a proposed 
isidency by ballet dancer Robert Johnson, who lives in the Western Addition, graduated from 
ie School of the Arts and is now with the SF Ballet, and another residency proposal by Danny 
mean, noted playwright from the Bay Area, to establish a repertory theater company at WACC. 
rrd also reported that the space is being utilized by Lorraine Hansberry Theater and Escola 
>va de Samba, both for rehearsals of upcoming productions. 
Byrd reported on a small fire which occurred last week (12/12/86) in the stairwell in the 
rear of the building. There was no damage, and the Fire Department responded quickly. 



NAP COMMITTEE 12/18/86 page 3 

James Kjorvestad reported on the award of a grant to the Costume Bank from the Skaggs 
Foundation for the purchase and construction of new costumes. A smaller grant was awarded 
to the Costume Bank earlier in the year to provide more costumes to the community. He also 
reported on the recent SOMA Christmas party for South of Market youth. Kjorvestad stated 
that this was an outgrowth of an event which took place originally at the SOMA Cafe. Given 
the great response on suich short notice to the community (over 400 children attending) , 
SOMAR will be working on getting additional funding to support this event and arts education 
activities at the center. 

Theilen reported on the progress of the Bayview Opera House, which is closed right 

now due to building renovation. The Arts Commission, at this time, does not have a 

working relationship with the Board of Bayview. Commissioner Paterson stated that 

it would be best to have the building open until there is a relationship worked out with 

the Board. Theilen added that the board needs to be put on notice at the next Commission 

meeting about the Commission's intent to not renew the MOU with AREPO. 

Isaacs reported that AREPO had hired another director for the building, unfortunately, 
there is no money to pay him. Commissioner Paterson raised a concern about who has access 
to the building. Theilen replied that at present, while renovation work is going on, no 
one has access to the building. Theilen also clarified that the NAP had hired Richard 
Partee as a program consultant for the building, and was paying him through leftover 
"Art Soup" funds. Isaacs added that the 12/6 event, which was a joint effort of both the 
Park and Recreation department and the Arts Commission as well as the Mayor's office, 
was not acknowledged by the AREPO board. Those programs that were known to be scheduled 
for the center have been accomodated in other sites (senior choir situation) . 

Commissioner Paterson asked for advice on what to recommend to the Commission about 
the situation at Bayview. Staff recommended that the Arts Commission MOU with the AREPO 
hoard should be allowed to expire. Isaacs stated that the AREPO Board president, Mary 
lopkins, refuses to acknowledge any problem exists at the center. Isaacs raised the 
question, should the Commission re-negotaite the MOU or let it expire? Com. Paterson 
[stated that the Arts Commission's attempts at negotiation have been sufficient, and this 
hxpiration was the next course of action. 

1EW BUSINESS: Theilen distributed to the Commissioners present copies of the request to 
I he Finance Committee. Listed in priority were: 1) Restoration of Bayview Opera House's 
I tage floor; 2) Funding for a twenty-year retrospective film project for NAP; 3) Support 

or two community festivals (Visitaction Valley, Tenderloin); 4) Twenty-year retrospective 
[eport on the Neighborhood Arts Program; 5) Consultation services - Youth Apprenticeship 
Iroject . 

Commissioner Paterson felt that there was not enough information on items 2, 4, and 5 
■ o make an appropriate decision. He recommended that Items 1 and 3 be brought to the 
laxt Finance Committee meeting, and that further consideration be given to the other 
I terns in the NAP Committee. Theilen stated that an annual report will be needed, especially 

) mark the time of NAP's 20th year. Isaacs added that the Levi-Strauss Foundation wants 
|) see an annual report from the NAP/Arts Commission. 

:eting adjourned 6:15pm 




SP 



A70,50 Sf CUM Cryw 



NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM ROUNDTABLE MEETING 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 



26 JANUARY 1987 



55 M IN U T E S 



3 191987 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHRUC LIBRAPV 



45 Hyde Street 

Suite 319 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

415 558 3463 



This Roundtable meeting of the Arts Commission convened at 455 
Franklin Street — The San Francisco Ballet building on 26 
January 1987. Commissioner William Paterson, Chair of the 
Neighborhood Arts Committee brought the meeting to order at 
3:12 p.m. 



MAYOR 
Dianne Feinstein 



COMMISSIONERS 

Jacqueline Nemerovski 
President 

Robert LaRocca 
Vice President 

Vernon Alley 
Timothy Duncan 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Jo Hanson 
William Paterson 
Anna-Marie B. Metwally 
George T. Rockrise 
Peter Rodriguez 
Roselyne C. Swig 
Felix M. Warburg 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Presidents of the 
Fine Arts Museum, 
Library Commission, 
Planning Commission, 
Recreation and Park 
Commission 



PRESENT : 

Commissioners : 

Jacqueline Nemerovski 
Timothy Duncan 
Stanley Eichelbaum 
Jo Hanson 
William Paterson 

FOA 

Jeanne Bogardus 



Staff 

Claire Isaacs 
Anne Marie Theilen 
Fe Bongolan 
Leah Forbes 
Michael Bell 

NAP Representatives ' 
Richard Reineccius 
Meg Madden 
Enola Maxwell 
Sharon Tannenbaum 



Neighborhood Centers' 
Representatives : 

Ron Gallegos 
Charles Byrd 
Ruth Morgan 
John Kreidler 
Jim Kjorvestad 
Allen Meier 
Oscar Maciel 
Andrea Tucker-Hody 
Lou Harris 
Arleen Stewart 



Anne Marie Theilen, Director of the Neighborhood Arts Program read the 
day's agenda and reported that there will be discussion from the floor 
after each item is reported on by the staff. Fe Bongolan reiterated 
the Director's statement and interjected that if there were any salient 
points that needed to be added, the appropriate time would be after the 
agenda item presentation. 

I. Cultural Centers' Renovation 



DIRECTOR 
ll^aire N. Isaacs 




Ms. Theilen reported that the Centers were in need of repair from 
the time of their purchase and there had been much difficulty in 
planning and securing funding. She reported that the Western 
Addition Cultural Center began in 1983 with Phase I at a cost of 
$399,000. She stated that a 228-seat theatre, gallery space and 
first floor restrooms had been constructed. Phase II in 1984 
amounted to $242,000 for code work and general improvement of the 
programming areas and $641,000 was expended and another $400,000 
is needed to complete the renovation. She added that the Center 
is open and thriving and is still in need of funds. 

Mission Cultural Center 

Ms. Theilen reported that in 1983-84 the Mission Cultural Center's 
Phase I work consisted of an installation of the sprinkling system 
at a cost of $75,000 and that the Phase II Tenovation became a 
complex task due to the structure previously being a furniture 
store and converting it to a public occupancy facility required 
extensive structural work to comply with City codes. She stated 
that the work is not completed but that the program has done the 
best it could and has spent $923,000. The program had to find 
another $123,000 that cost "points" with the community because 
they felt the action was delayed but the delay, she concluded, 
was the lack of funding. 



Roundtable Meeting -2- ARTS COMMISSION 

26 January 1987 NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 

South of Market Cultural Center 

Phase I of the reconstruction, reported Ms. Theilen, is currently underway with 
an anticipated completion date of April 1987. The structural foundation needed 
extensive work in addition to fire sprinklers and electrical work. 

Ms. Theilen reported that the code work for all of the cultural centers had been 
the most important due to the responsibility for public assembly safety and must 
take priority over program development. President Nemerovski interjected that 
the Centers have the potential of raising funds that will derive from public 
assembly, therefore creating legal and safe assembly space is the priority. 
Ms. Theilen reported that the construction costs totaled $563,000 at SOMAR 
and that there will be some work in the workshop spaces , and /referred those present 
to the Agenda, where future changes in the building were prioritized. 

Ms. Theilen stated that when the Cultural Centers were purchased, it was done 
with the understanding the buildings would be maintained, at an idealistic 
presentation to the Board of Supervisors; and now, ten years later, the program 
is still attempting to maintain staff and renovte the centers. In reply to 
Commissioner Eichelbaum's query, Ms. Theilen reported that the renovation was 
partially funded by federal money. President Nemerovski reported that private 
funders will not support a tax-supported facility. Mr. John Kreidler of the 
S.F. Foundation reported that when Davies Hall was being constructed it was 
supported by private organizations and only when it was completed, did they 
turn it over to the City. Ms. Theilen stated ,that at the onset s the NEA had 
been applied to for grants but that the Centers' being out of compliance 
became a crucial problem. Once the buildings are in code compliance the 
foundation will be laid for future programming growth. 

II. Facilities Maintenance 

Ms. Bongolan reported that building maintenance is done on a day-by-day basis, 
through the Arts Comnmission Offices with the Department of Public Works - building 
repair. She quoted the budget projection of $70,000 for basic repairs. She 
reported that the Bureau of Building Repair will also do capital building projects 
and though they are not renovation projects, they upgrade existing systems in a 
building such as new heating, copper pipe and window glazing at the WACC. She 
reported that the foundation of the Bayview Opera House had been replaced last 
year, along with painting of the exterior of the builiding. She reported also 
that the operating budget ■" from 1978-1984 was $75,000 because, up until that 
time, the buildings had not been renovated and currently the budget is $40,000 because 
the centers' had been upgraded and repaired and less money is needed as the buildings 
are renovated. She added that an increase of up to $70,000 is being requested because 
other repairs are anticipated due to the centers structures' age and increase use 
of them, by the public. 

III. Memorandum of Understanding 

Ms. Theilen reported that the Memorandum of Understanding was created in 1983 to 
define the role and responsibility of the Arts Commission and the Cultural Centers. 
Currently, she continued, the scope of the MOU covers the programming policy and 
plan, building policy ,and plan with the focus on insuring that the buildings are 
to be used for cultural purposes , only , for the community, and to insure the City 
against liability. She added that an MOU or contract is now needed that will 
include guidelines for expending and setting aside donations and fees collected 
at each center. She then quoted the purpose and requirements of the MOU that 
were listed in the Agenda and reported that the Friends of the Mission Cultural Center 
are operating under the MOU signed in October of 1986 and will expire in June, 1987. 



Roundtable Meeting ARTS COMMISSION 

26 January 1987 -3- NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 

The Friends of the Support Services for the Arts (SOMAR) , signed the MOU 
in November, 1986 and that will expire in June, 1987; the Commission is 
currently negotiating with the Board of the Western Addition Cultural Center 
for a MOU that will extend from February to June, 1987 . Continuing, Ms. 
Theilen reported that The Bayview Opera House MOU is pending until the 
formation of a new advisory board. She said the Commission's goal is to 
create a contract and/ the Board of Supervisors and the Mayor's Office 
participate in its creation to make perfectly clear the responsibility of 
each party. Ms. Theilen then quoted the City and County fiscal year figures 
representing contributions to the Centers and pointed out the necessity 
of a facility maintenance position and bookkeeping position for each center 
to be included in the budget. Discussion ensued on the necessity of insurance 
and the costs versus the expense of a law suit against the Center and the strain 
it places each Center under, to meet the expenses required to sign a MOU with 
the City/Arts Commission. In conclusion she reported that the MOU had been 
responsible for defining and clarifying, and gaining respect for the role 
of facility management and programming at each Center, in spite of the 
seriousness of the situation of each Center attempting to comply with the 
insurance and personnel costs. 

President Nemerovski stated that these problems could not be solved in a day 
and that the Commission is dealing with a situation that is ongoing when 
dealing with capital money that makes projects available without planning 
for future costs and expenses of maintaining the projects. She stated also 
that the Board of Supervisors will be amazed at the expense incurred when they 
examine the current f budgets and the projected costs for maintenance and manage- 
ment, and that the Commission should be ready, and prepared, to lobby City Hall 
for the Centers. Director Isaacs interejcted that the shortage of funds in 
the City's contingency fund makes" the situation more grave in that social 
services take priority over the arts and when the Arts Commission approaches 
the Mayor and Board of Supervisors it must be with an attitude of responsibility 
when requesting funds. 

Technical Assistance 

Ms. Bongolan reported on the types of assistance the program provides (consultation 
and referral) and the targeted recipients (individual artists, arts organizations, 
community and municipal organizations) seeking cultural programming information. She 
described the program publications that were distributed in the folders at the onset 
of the meeting: Schedule of Free Arts Classes; Sources and Resources for the 
Visual Artist ; Art Soup , and Young People's Arts Programs in San Francisco. 

Underserved Communities 

Ms. Bongolan introduced the coordinators of the programs for the underserved 
communities projects: Sharon Tannenbaum - Tenderloin Hospitality House; 
Ruth Morgan - Programs for People - S.F. County Jail Project; Enola Maxwell, 
Executive Director - Potrero Hill Neighborhood House; Andrea Tucker-Hody, 
Potrero Hill Neighborhood House Program Coordinator. Ms. Bongolan continued 
reporting ; she stated that when the program began work with the underserved 
communities during 1984, it re-established the Commission's ties with 
programs that it had previously been involved with under CETA and the 
Facilities Renovation Fund. Relative to the Tenderloin Hospitality House, the 
City assisted funding the adaptation of a storefront into an art studio. 
Renovation funds assisted Potrero Hill Neighborhood House's theatre, and in 
Visitacion Valley and the S.F. Sheriff's Department , Jail Arts Project. 
She described how the NAP is currently working with the on-site coordinators to 
develop each center's program, as reflected in the Agenda. President Nemerovski 
invited representatives of the underserved communities projects to report. 



Roundtable Meeting Minutes -4- ARTS COMMISSION 

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 
Tenderloin Hospitality House 

Ms. TaJinenbaum reported that the center had been in existance for twenty years 
and had recently begun exhibiting artwork successfully, due to the assistance of 
the NAP and has had a recent, favorable review from Kenneth Baker, art critic. 
She also reported that the program has been valuable and successful in assisting the 
Hospitality House become recognized outside the Tenderloin District. 

Jail Arts Program 

Ms. Ruth Morgan of the Jail Arts Program reported that this program is designed 
to ease the transition of the inmates to the "outside." The program has 
a resident artist, at the jail, to work with the inmates and then stays in 
contact with them when they leave. She reported it has been a successful and 
innovative program with plans next year for a quilt-making project. 

Potrero Hill Neighborhood House 

Enola Maxwell of the Potrero Hill Neighborhood House stated they are all grateful 
to the Arts Commission NAP and reported on the current programs underway there. 
AndreaTucker-Hody of that Center reported also, stating that it had been an exciting 
year and that the current exhibit had 300 artists participating and also that her 
classes are fully attended. 

Director Isaacs interjected that the funds for the S.F. Sheriff's Department program 
(reflected on the Underserved Communities Budget of the Agenda) was partially 
funded by the Hotel Tax and the Public Art Fund and that this money is not a 
regularly allocated amount; she said that the General Fund paid only for the two 
staff personnel and the office expenses. 

Chinese Cultural Center 

Ms. Bongolan reported that Julie Cheung, Director of the CCC is working with 
the community advisory members and she reported on the history of that center 
and stated that the funding of that center derives from the Hotel Tax Fund, also. 
The Director reported on a recent sculpture exhibition at the Chinese Cultural 
Center of artist Shi Zhimin. 

Special Projects 

Ms. Bongolan reported that the Young People's Apprentice Arts Project evolved 
from the Mayor's Anti-Graffiti Program and Ms. Theilen's involvement by which 
she impressed that program with the need to eliminate graffiti by involving 
the City's youth population in a way that would allow them to positively express 
their artistic creativity. She stated further, that it is the hope of the 
Program that this apprentice arts project will expand to include specific 
types of organizations and production companies to actively involve the kids 
in the arts. 

Young People's Arts Festival 

Anne Marie Theilen reported that planning began two-years ago and the Commission 
has now designated May 2nd through 6th as the dates for the Festival that will 
take place at Golden Gate Park in the concourse area between the DeYoung Museum 
and the Academy of Sciences. She reported that there are 72 organizations 
working with the program to produce this Festival for the Arts Commission, in 
collaboration with the School District and the Support Services for the Arts. 
She reported on some of the activities planned and the Director interjected that 
the official name of the Festival is Golden Gateway to the Arts , in celebration 
of the Golden Gate Bridge's 50th anniversary. 



Roundtable Meeting Minutes -5- ARTS COMMISSION 

1-26-87 NEIGHBORHOOD ARTSTROGRAM 

NAP Twentieth Anniversar y 

Ms. Bongolan reported that 1987 celebrates the 20th anniversary of the NAP 
and the genesis of the neighborhood arts programs in the United States. 
She stated that the Arts Commission and the program will take this 
opportunity to examine past events and accomplishments and evaluate that 
status of the program relative to its progress from a municipal arts 
agency to an independent program, to the ultimate goal of a community 
arts program that works with community boards. This proposed 20-year 
retrospective report will be used to educate other members of the arts 
community in metropolitan areas who are interested in establishing 
neighborhood arts programs - it will be a recounting of the San Francisco 
experience. 

Ms. Theilen reported on the staff time that each component of the NAP required, 
including Commission, program and other City Departments contributing time to 
the operation of the program's maintenance and operation. President Nemerovski 
commended Ms. Theilen for presenting the day's meeting in a clear and under- 
standable way. She added, that the Commission should study the material presented and 
that there would be on-going discussion on how best to deal with the problems 
and to, better, staff the programs. The President then invited comments from 
others that were present. 

Commissioner Eichelbaum stated that the program was to be commended for its 
accomplishments in light of the dirth of funds that is indemic to all arts 
organizations. Commissioner Paterson also acknowledged Ms. Theilen and Ms. 
Bongolan. 

VI. Discussion 

Director Isaacs reported that the subject of development and fund raising could 
be the topic of another roundtable meeting and she stated that the inter-relationship 
of the Arts Commission annual POPS concerts Series to all of the Commission's programs 
is pertinent in that it is the source from which funds for the programs generate . 
She reported to the meeting that money from the City is minimal. She said that 
she had just returned from an arts administrator's conference on Urban Arts and 
it was the consensus there that the trend towards community arts, especially 
minority arts, is returning. Continuing she reported that San Francisco could 
again be in the leadership position if a way is found to have strong cultural 
Boards, complete renovations of the centers, and have enough revenue to operate 
programs. In conclusion she stated that the Arts Commission has always had 
the leadership in this area and that it should not now be lost. 

Commissioner Swig stated that the best way to receive attention from the private 
sector is to gain stronger support and better ties with City Hall. 

Arts Commission/NAP Role in Development of the Multi-Cultural Arts Community 

Director Isaacs reported that the California Arts Council has indicated there 
should be more activity in "multi-cultural arts." She stated that she was not 
certain of how that term was to be interpreted and whether the Arts Commission 
should be thinking what the role is in terms of the NAP, per se, of serving 
the multi-cultural community by expanding, defining and developing it, and looking 
at it in terms of grant-making or whether the Commission needs to assist 
organizations in a different way. 



Roundtable Meeting Minutes -6- ARTS COMMISSION 

26 January 1987 NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 

Ms. Bongolan, in reply to the Director's question, stated that she is a member of 
the Board of the California Expansion Arts and that organization would like to 
see further development and support of what the California Arts Council is doing 
in terms of defining its constituency for all its arts programs. She stated 
also that it was her sense that the Arts Commission was not fully represented 
at the CAC, based upon the remarks relative to the "lack of multi-cultural 
representation" by the Arts Commission. 

defined, 
The Director, Claire Isaacs, requested to have /the term "minority arts" vs. 
"multi-cultural arts." Oscar Maciel - Mission Cultural Center Director 
replied that he had testified before the CAC two-years ago when the 
term, "multi-cultural" and the program was accepted. He stated they had 
reported to the CAC that "minority-arts" was stigmatizing and that the 
term multi-cultural represented for them, funding and attention for support 
of the arts being established/other than the traditional disciplines such 
as the ballet and opera which, traditionally has had the cultural advantage. 

Ms. Bongolan stated that the definition for multi-cultural doesn't define 
the discipline, but rather, it defines the artist and the constituency. 
The definition for multi-cultural includes, but is not limited to Asian 
Black, Hispanic, native American and other arts organizations whose arts 
emphasis are of a specific ethnic or cultural expression. Mr. Maciel 
suggested that the Arts Commission communicate with the Multi-Cultural 
Advisory Panel of the California Arts Council to further define the 
term. Director Isaacs replied that she is appreciative of the fact that 
Ms. Bongolan and Mr. Maciel are actively affiliated with the organizations that 
promote the multi-cultural programs for the arts and that this issue is 
"burgeoning up" in the United States. The Director reported also that 
two-years ago the NEA had nearly pulled the Council's grant from the 
NEA due to the lack of attention in this area and it precipitated a major 
crisis. She stated that the State/Local Partnership, in a bold move, had 
applied to the CAC for a grant that would give money to individual artists 
in a multi-cultural community. The Commission was turned down with the 
reason being that the Arts Commission is not known as an agency that has dealt 
with this issue. She stated that it was an odd response in that the 
Commission had been the vanguard for the Neighborhood Arts Programs in the 
country. She stated also that in exploring the reason for the rejection 
she felt that perhaps the panelists who wrote the opinion, simply did not 
recognize what the Arts Commission had been doing up until now, as relating 
to the current concerns of the multi-cultural arts. She stated in conclusion 
that the Commission should ignore the rebuff and do some hard thinking about 
the multi-cultural constituency of San Francisco and how it relates to 
NAP and what State/Local Partnership is attempting to accomplish. Mr. Maciel 
interjected that one of the reasons the multi-cultural panel of the CAC 
rejected the application was due to the taxation by representation - that 
the hispanic population represents fifteen percent of San Francisco's popu- 
lation and that there was discrepancy between the percentage of the population, 
and the tax money received, by that population for the arts. Commissioner Swig 
stated that the Commission needs to have another Roundtable Meeting and a new 
Mission Statement. She stated that the Arts Commission is being interpreted across 
the country in a way that it is not being interpreted in the San Francisco 
community - as a spokes body for the community. She stated that although the 
current statement is broad, it needs to reflect the indepth accomplishments 
of the Commission. 



Roundtable Meeting -7- ARTS COMMISSION 

26 January 1987 NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 

Mr. Richard Reineccius of the Julian Theatre inquired if there was a budget 
for the special reports projected; Ms. Bongolan stated that all of the 
projects will require fund raising as there are no appropriated funds. 
Director Isaacs interjected that the Young People's Arts Festival is 
funded by the Arts Commission, Arts Festival allocation for 1986-87. Mr. 
Reineccius stated that the retrospective report planned will be extremely 
helpful and might generate interest and support for the program. Director 
Isaacs stated that 1987-88 is a critical year and the Neighborhood Arts 
Program must keep pushing forward because the consciousness of the country 
on this issue is unbalanced, right now, and she added, that many of the 
persons present at this meeting have worked for twenty years and if they 
relented now it would be another twenty years before progress would be visible. 
Mr. Reineccius reported that the NEA Theatre Program had cut their grants per 
year from 400, to less than 100 this year, and that the large, established 
theatre companies are receiving the funds. Commisisoner Swig encouraged 
the Commisison to be prepared and conscious ot major construction projects 
in the City and take those opportunities to make certain^all concerned parties 
have all the reports published by the Commission, relative to the arts 
impact on the City, to influence them. 

Director Isaacs reported that Mayor Feinstein had contacted her regarding 
her concern about drug use in the Bayview-Hunter ' s Point Districts. She 
reported that the Mayor had requested her to tour the two recreation 
centers there that are not used to their maximum potential and requested 
that Director Isaacs inquire of the street artists if they would be interested 
in teaching their crafts to the members of the community, there. 

Commissioner Swig reported that if the Mayor could be convinced that money for 
the arts would result in law in order, as members of the community develop 
arts programs at the Centers to reduce malicious mischief, and have people 
develop creative expression, rather than some other type of gratification 
deriving from frustration, she stated that the Mayor might allocate more 
money for the arts rather than spending more on police and fire protection as 
a way to bring about law and order. 

Ms. Theilen reported that the Western Addition Cultural Center was experiencing 
the same problems as Bayview and she stated that the WACC Board's first priority 
for the Center is safety. She added that the Centers do not have enough funding 
for the staff required to serve large numbers of chldren. Mr. Lou Harris of 
the WACC Board reported that to have an unsupervised bulding filled with un- 
supervised children creates a dangerous environment and he added that the children 
of the Western Additon are hungry for something to do after school hours and 
the Center is there and visible. It is a waste, he stated, to have the facility 
and not to be able to use it due to not enough funds for insurance. Commissioner 
Swig stated this is a message that Director Isaacs could take to the Mayor. 

Ms. Enola Maxwell of the Potrero Hill Neighborhood House stated she is a resident 
of the Bayview District and that the funds for that area, that the Mayor is 
talking about, are not going to be enough to bring the kinds of programming and 
staff that is needed to maintain an alternative to the drug scene. She stated 
that the community does not want the Mayor to talk to others, outside of their 
community, who do not know the community and its needs. Rather, she continued, 
the community, itself, wants to decide. Additionally, she stated that there 
is not adequate lighting in the premises and that there is something wrong with 
a system if a cultural center has been opened for ten years and cannot be used. 



Roundtable Meeting -8- ARTS COMMISSION 

26 January 1987 NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM 

Director Isaacs acknowledged Ms. Maxwell and stated she was happy to hear the 
concerns of all and that she would carry the information to the Mayor when 
she meets with her again. 

Commissioner Paterson adjourned the meeting at 5:06 p.m. 

Submitted by: 

Patricia Kidd \ 

Commission Secretary 




A7o.ro 

blitl&n 

^;^| Neighborhood Arts Program 

MINUTES - NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 6/18/87 

DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Rodriguez 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan JUL S '387 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Byrd, Maciel, Kjorvestad, Partee s p RANniQPrk 
NAC REPRESENTATIVE: Kruger pumjc Ilirpaqv 

Theilen distributed copies of articles on new arts organizations that may be of interest 
to the cultural centers, the first called the Community Thrift Store, which takes used 
clothing on consignment to benefit non-profit arts organizations, the second, the Multi- 
cultural Children's Museum, is now meeting with representatives from the arts and community 
organizations city-wide and is now in development. 

The outline of a section of the report from the Mayor's Office on programs in the arts 
for youth was distributed to the Program Directors for review and correction. Theilen also 
reported that in follow-up to a letter sent by NAP to the cultural centers on a project by 
the Kadeka Dances for Kids (to produce a city- wide event) that the proposed date of the 
event, May 1-4, 1988, has been changed to the first week of April. 

MAINTENANCE/RENOVATION : Theilen reported that the renovation at SOMAR has been delayed. A 
meeting, scheduled June 22, has been coordinated to resolve the issues surrounding this 
delay, and a new deadline for completion will be requested from the contractor. 

Theilen also reported on the need to get fire extinguishers serviced at the centers. Safety 
Right, now on contract with the city, has been contacted to complete the work. Repair work 
has been completed on the Mission Cultural Center's freight elevator, which sustained consi- 
derable damage during years of use. The state elevator safety bureau has been contacted to 
inspect the elevator. This will occur the last week of June. 

Theilen reported that funds for repairs have been used up, with some much-needed repairs 
at the centers still pending at Bayview and SOMAR. Remaining repairs will be done when 
there is a possible life-safety situation or emergency. On a positive note, she added that 
next year's repair budget has increased by $15,000 from $40,000 to $55,000. Partee stated 
that even though the situation of the stairs at Bayview was not a life -safety problem (stairs 
were ripped open to stash illegal drugs), it still posed a crime prevention problem which is 
related to safety. Theilen asked Partee to photograph the damaged areas for NAP's report/ 
request to DPW for Cultural Center maintenance needs. 

PROGRAM REPORTS : Maciel reported on the success of the Carlos Santan exhibit at the Mission 
Cultural Center's Galeria Museo, and announced the center's plans to extend this exhibition 
another month. He also reported that in preparing for this exhibit, a trip was made to Pier 
70 for some glass display cases, and had found that some items belonging to NAP had been 
taken or vandalized, including a drill press and framing table blades. Theilen responded 
that there had been many problems reported on Pier 70, including its security and damage 
to Arts Commission property stored there. This item will be taken up with Claire Isaacs. 

Maciel reported that there will be a benefit showing of "La Bamba" at the New Mission 
Theater to benefit the Mission Cultural Center. 

Bongolan questioned Maciel on his written report which described the process of working 
with the community to refine building use guidelines and policies, and asked for clarification 
on whether or not this was why there has been no response to the NAP memo of 2/26/87 reques- 
ting an updated version of these documents. Maciel responded that because the community pro- 
cess was time consuming, but very important, that it would take another 2 months before these 
documents would be completed. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




Partee reported on the Bayview Opera House's Open House celebration in late May. Attendance 
for the event grew as the weekend progressed, with a performance by Judith Holten's BES 
Children's Educational Theater drawing community attention. Upcoming at the Bayview will be 
a Juneteenth celebration in the center's outdoor courtyard. Partee also confirmed that he 
was able to get the commitment of 6 people to sit on the Advisory Committee for the center. 

Kjorvestad reported on the SOMAR gallery main exit door needing repair, and on a retro- 
spective exhibit of silkscreen prints by Chester Yoshida and Nancy Horn at the Academy of 
Art gallery. Kjorvestad 's written report included publicity on the mural deidications for 
Mike Rios and Nicole Emmanuel's Potrero Hill mural. He added that it was the hope of SOMAR' s 
board and staff to get the building re-open in September. 

Byrd reported that WACC repair needs include re-charging of fire extinguishers and replacing 
the old batteries for the emergency exit lights. He added that the James Phillips show at the 
Sargent Johnson Gallery which has drawn oublic attention has been extended. 

MOU UPDATE : Theilen distributed copies of the memo to the NAP Committee requesting to extend 
the South of Market Cultural Center and Mission Cultural Center MOU's for another three months 
to complete compliance issues and resolve the question of insurance, and to update the commis- 
sioners on the NAC MOU. 

Kruger asked for clarification on how the MOU negotiation would take place, expressing the 
need to get a procedure established. Kjorvestad responded that the MOU extension was appreci- 
ated. Anne stated that a negotiation process was in place. Kruger clarified her role as NAC rep 

Kruger added that she felt she was not being facilitated in meeting with the City Attorney 
by Arts Commission staff. Com. Rodriguez recommended that the NAP Director arrange an appoint- 
ment between the City Attorney and NAC Attorney to resolve any issues remaining on the NAC MOU. 

Com. Rodriguez asked how a recommendation to extend the MOU's can be done without a commit- 
tee quorum. Bongolan responded that a phone poll of committee members would be conducted, if 
necessary, to get a committee recommendation to the full Arts Commission. Anne replied that 
Kruger 's request had been conveyed to the City Attorney, and that the City Attorney had stated 
that she was waiting for Kruger 's further request for a meeting, and that it needed confirma- 
tion. 



meeting adjourned 5:45pm 



fnb 




__ DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

A70.5O 

* M- AUG 18 IS 

ISS^ Neighborhood Arts Program 

NAP Committee Meeting ^ July 30, 1987 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Paterson, Eichelbaum 
ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongo Ian 

Theilen distributed information packets containing: 1) NAP Goals and Objectives 1987-88; 
2) Underserved Communities - Programming Report; 3) Hotel Tax Fund Budget 86-87, 87-88, 
Public Arts Fund request 1987-88; and 4) Hotel Tax Fund (Grants for the Arts) proposed 
budget for 1988-89 and Public Arts Fund request (planning) 1988-89. (SEE ATTACHED). 

I. GOALS 

After review of the NAP Goals and Objectives, Commissioners asked about the current status 
of the existing MOU's with the South of Market Cultural Center and Mission Cultural Center 
boards. Theilen reported that the MOU extension voted for at the Commission meeting in 
July is allowing for time to resolve compliance issues for the cultural center boards. She 
added that since the last NAP Committee meeting, the FSSA has brought its MOU into compli- 
ance, however, information is still pending from the FMCC. The new MOU extension will ex- 
pire September 30, 1987. 

Commissioner Paterson expressed his concern that with time needed to negotiate the new 
MOU and the importance of having the current MOU in compliance, that a letter should be 
drafted by staff to the FMCC, suggesting that a meeting take place between the Arts Commis- 
sion and FMCC regarding FMCC's MOU. 

Theilen reported further that renovation funding has been approved for WACC, Mission, 
and South of Market Cultural Centers. The new funds will be used for plan specifications 
for all three buildings. Com. Paterson asked for clarification on the planning. It was ex- 
plained that the Master Plans for Mission and WACC were completed in 1981 and needed an 
update, while SOMAR's plan needed further specific drawings for future programs spaces. 
It was also clarified that this planning process will allow for more time for the cultural 
centers to work with their communities in planning program space. 

II. PROGRAMMING REPORT 



Bongo Ian reported on the current status of the Underserved Communities projects at the Visi- 
tacion Valley, Tenderloin Hospitality House, Potrero Hill Neighborhood House Chinatown NAP 
and Sheriff's Department County Jail Program. Paterson asked about the lease relationship 
for the Chinese Cultural Center/Chinatown NAP. Theilen reported that the lease agreement 
entitles the city to use a portion of the Chinese Culture Center space for community arts 
activities. Funding for this program comes from Grants for the Arts funds. The agreement 
is shceduled to expire in 1990. 

Further information was requested on the multicultural publication. Theilen stated that 
the publication would be done in advance and preparatory to the Multicultural Arts Festival 
to be produced by the Arts Commission next year. Paterson also asked about the funding 
status of NAP's 20-year report. Theilen reported that funds should be coming for this report 
through the Swig Foundation. No word has come in yet from the Swig Foundation since the 
proposal was submitted in early July. 

III. BUDGET REVIEW /PLANNING 

tfter review of current FY 87=88 and 88-89 budgets for Grants for the Arts (Hotel Tax Fund ) 
Commissioner Eichelbaum asked for an update on the cultural center insurance information, 
"heilen reported that Friends of the Arts Commission Chair Ron Gal legos was working with 
he cultural centers to get programming information pertinent to the city's insurance concerns, 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




p. 2 

Paterson asked if Keith Grand (City Risk Manager) had received the insurance information 
from the cultural centers as requested from the meeting with cultural center representatives 
in May. Theilen replied that it has not come in. She added that this is holding up the pro- 
cess for the Risk Manager to ascertain the best solution to the cultural center insurance 
problem, and tha- information is needed right away. 

Paterson requested that staff receive a copy of the letter to be sent by Gal legos to the 
cultural centers requesting the insurance information. 

After review of NAP's request to the Arts Commission's Public Arts Fund and the proposed 
budget for Grants for the Arts for 88-89, Theilen added that the requests for the Richmond/ 
Sunset festivals has been retained for this year's upcoming request, and stressed the need 
to follow through on the development of the Arts Apprenticeship publication for youth, which 
is becoming a pressing need in the community. 

IV. OTHER BUSINESS 

Theilen reported briefly that the Public Works Committee of the Board of Supervisors will 

be meeting August 13th on the renovation of the Mission Cultural Center. 



meeting adjourned 5:15pm 



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SECTION B 

All requests are for supplementary program expenditure. Income and expenses 
come from general funds. 

'Die goals and objectives for NAP's request for 1986-87 are: 

1. Vis itacion Valley Festival $3,000. (funded) 

2. Tenderloin Arts Festival $3,000. (funded) 

3. Sunset district community event 500. (to be . requested). * 

4. Richmond district cojiimunity event 500. , (to be requested). * 

5. Multicultural publication 

(consultant cost, printing cost)l,000. (to be requested) ** 

0. ZO-year Anniversary Retrospective 

Report 5,000. (on request) *** 



* The Riclunond and Sunset district community celebrations are still in planning 
and we are assisting the Richmond district in a June children's event. We are 
working towards defining a project's community impact and possible events in 
the Sunset district, working with the branch of the Public Library in the 
neighborhood and A. P. Giannini School. 

** The Multicultural Publication is in its planning stages. It will be used as 
and introduction to the planning for the multicultural symposia and will 
assist the gallery, state/local and NAP in working on a collaborative effort 
for the Arts Festival. 

*** The 20-Year Anniversary Retrospective Report is on request. It is essential 
for NAP to conveythe 20 years evolution/history of the NAP Program (See At- 
tached Prospectus). 



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&>Sk Neighborhood Arts Program 

NAP COMMITTEE MEETING January 21, 1988 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Eichelbaum, LaRocca, Rodriguez 
ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan, Isaacs, Rumsey 

PROJECT COORDINATORS: Sharon Tanenbaum (Tenderloin Hospitality House), Ruth Morgan (SF 
Sheriff's Department - Programs for People), Julia Kavanah (Visitacion Valley Community 
Center) , Andrea Tucker-Hody (Potrero Hill Neighborhood House) , Julie Cheung (CNAP - ex- 
cused) . 

PROJECT REPORTS; 

Julia Kavanah, Executive Director of the WCC, reported on last year's activities for WCC's 
"Theaterworks", funded by NAP through Grants for the Arts. She stated that this was the year 
that seniors of the center got involved with the program's youth, which was a main intent " 
of the project, and enabled 1he project to evolve from a youth project to an inter generational 
theater program. She added that the workshop enables youth and adults to learn acting, set 
design, writing, and costume design. Kavanah stated that the ultimate goal of this program 
was to establish a resident theater company for the center, recalling that the "Valley Players" 
a theater group which performed and produced plays through the center in the 60 's and 70 's 
were based at WCC. 

WCC is currently working with another theater group to develop intergenerational plays, and 
is working on outreach to outlying communities to present new productions by Theaterworks. She 
invited Commissioners to attend a backer's rehearsal on Saturday, March 12 at the center. 

Andrea Tucker-Hody, workshop coordinator of the visual arts workshops at Potrero Hill Neigh- 
borhood House reported on the papermaking workshops she conducts for youth and adults of the 
Potrero Hill district. This is the 2nd year of NAP support for this project, and through it, 
participants have been able to expand awareness of different cultures and their abilities. The 
workshop includes projects in Mexican cut-outs and papermaking, Japanese paper-folding tech- 
niques, papermaking with local flowers and other plants. 

Hody stated that goals for this coming year include increasing visibility of the work pro- 
duced through the program. This last year, she participated in presenting a demonstration for 
over 600 children at an event coordinated by the Children's Multicultural Museum. An exhibit 
of workshop artwork will be taking place in September at City Hall. She also reported that the 
program has been successful in soliciting donations from the business community .in supplies 
such as pulp and a paper press. 

Commissioner Rodriguez suggested that Hody and her workshop participants get involved in 
the Arts Commission's Festival at the Hall of Flowers later this year. 

Sharon Tanenbaum related the history and current functions of the Tenderloin Hospitality House, 
stating that the arts program is a drop- in studio where participants can come in to do their 
own work with guidance by the visual arts instructor. NAP support helped begin "the exhibition 
of workshop participant artwork. Since its beginning three years ago, the exhibition program 
has expanded greatly through public recognition in the press, and growing foundation support. 
Tanenbaum added that currently, there are 50 artists who take part in the program, with a per- 
centage serious artists and the remaining others street people. All are Tenderloin residents. 
All students work with instructors on a one to one 'basis. 

Tanenbaum reported further that the exhibition program has generated support from the SF 
Foundation, Wallace Alexander Gerbode Fund and has almost tripled its CAC Organizational Grant 
award. The number of requests for exhibition of work has doubled from five last year to ten. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




1 



The Hospitality House's Community Arts Program has now established an art rental program 
where 60% of the rental proceeds go to the artist, while the remaining 40% goes to purchase 
of more materials and supplies. 

Tanenbaum added that efforts are now being made to work with the Southeast Asian Refugee 
Women's Program to develop children's after-school arts programs. 

Ruth Morgan, of Programs for People, gave a summary of the history of NAP support for ex- 
offenders through the Sheriff's Department. The main intent of this program is to help 
"trans itionalize" ex-offenders on their release from jail so that they can be positively 
involved with society. Currently, NAP is supporting poet Gloria Frym and quiltmaker Nan 
Katz in developing respectively and anthology of collected poems to be performed at the 
Intersection for the Arts later this year, and a quiltmaking workshop that will take place 
at the Western Addition Cultural Center with ex-offenders and neighborhood residents. 

Next year's re-entry program will focus on theater, with playwright Michelle Linfrante 
teaching both in the county jail and at Work Furlough, and John Bergman of Geese Theater, 
who has gained national recognition in his work with ex-offenders and whose teaching deals 
with the theme, "Rehearsing for Life". 

NAP GRANTS FOR THE ARTS APPLICATION 1988-89 

Theilen distributed copies of the proposed budget request for NAP Hotel Tax Funding for 1988- 
89. The request totals $127,000, and will support projects in the communities, cultural cen- 
ter contractual costs, and Chinatown NAP. 

Commissioner Rodriguez asked first about the status of the seating and carpeting for the Mission 
Cultural Center. Theilen reported that the funding is in the Bureau of Architecture and that 
the wait is now for a plan to come from the Mission on the seating configuration. 

Commissioner Rodriguez made the recommendation: "That NAP request the amount of $127,000 from 
the Grants for the Arts (formerly Hotel Tax Fund) for 1988-89, for projects in the community, 
cultural center contractual costs and Chinatown NAP". The recommendation was seconded by LaRocca 
and Eichelbaum. MOTION CARRIED. 



meeting adjourned 5:30pm 




tzc/ 

V/&/98 



f&sil Neighborhood Arts Program 



NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 3/18/88 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: LaRocca, Paterson, Eichelbaum 
ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan, Isaacs, Rumsey 
GUESTS: Jeannie Bogardus - Friends of the Arts Commission 

I. BAYVIEW OPERA HOUSE MANAGEMENT 

Theilen reported on her recent meeting with Friends of the Arts Commission Director Jeannie 
Bogardus and Bayview Opera House director Richard Partee to review and develop operations 
plans for the Bayview Opera House from March to June of FY 1987-88 and July to October of 
1988-89. The overall impact of this operations plan was to establish programs and make sure 
staff was in place at this center. 

Jeannie Bogardus reported on F o A*s role as fiscal agent for Bayview, and gave an account-. 
of its current fiscal status. She reported that it currently has an allotment from Grants for 
the Arts of $46,000 for the year, though, to date, it has not spent enough for reimbursement. 
She added that currently, Bayview has $4,000 in its account, however, funds must be spent in 
order to meet reimbursement requirements of the Grants for the Arts. Bogardus proposed that 
Bayview apply for a loan from the Arts Loan Fund to alleviate this cash flow situation. 

It was discussed that a monthly cash flow projection report needs to be developed so that 
Bogardus can approach the Arts Loan Fund for the appropriate loan amount. Theilen stated that 
the NAP office will follow through on this request. 

II. CULTURAL CENTER MAINTENANCE PROPOSAL 

Claire Isaacs reported on the origins for her proposal to the Commission at its March meeting 
to turn over the responsibility of coordinating cultural center maintenance to the Department 
of Public Works. This proposal was made at a meeting with Supervisor Gonzales, Norman Karasick 
of the Bureau of Architecture, (who was sent to represent Dick Evans of DPW) , Russ Able, Den- 
nis Rumsey and Com. Rockrise in late February. Isaacs reported that at the meeting, it was 
requested of Karasick to check into the ramifications of this proposal .with the City Attorney ' : 
Office. Isaacs asked that staff give their input at' this meeting. 

Theilen questioned the need for this proposal at this time, stating that it may be prematun 
for both the cultural centers and DPW. She added further that the centers have part-time staJ ' 
some of whom are under-trained in building and building equipment maintenance and repair. Sh 
added that the liability to the city could be compromised through this arrangement, question! a< 
how will the city's interests be protected when non-city personnel will be requesting and di- 
recting DPW staff to do repair projects. She added further that there is no insurance at 3 of 
the cultural centers, which has already increased the city's risk. She added that DPW is workii 
on a maintenance program for the cultural centers as well as for the entire city, and to changt 
the process now would be premature enough to disrupt the implementation of this new process 
with the centers. 

Commissioners agreed that the issue was at an impasse and further discussion was necessary. 
Isaacs requested that staff develop a written report on the possible impact and reasoning be- 
hind their objections to the new proposal. It was agreed that the report would be ready by Marc 
28th. 

III. MOU COMPLIANCE ISSUES - MISSION CULTURAL CENTER 

Theilen reported on the current status of completing MCC's compliance attach- 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




p. 2 

merits, and the bi-weekly meetings with MCC's Director. She stated that at the present time, 
with some of the compliance issues not completed, that the current MCC MOU needs to be ex- 
tended again until June 30, 1988. 

Commissioners asked questions about the MCC's current status - discussion included the 
need for MCC to complete its insurance payment responsibilities (including a $5,000 bill with 
no clear idea of what period of time this amount covers) . 

It was recommended that a letter is needed from FMCC that shows agreement with the need 
to extend its current MOU for another three months. 

Commission Paterson stated the motion, "That with a letter from FMCC agreeing to the ex- 
tension, that the Commission extend FMCC's current MOU until June 30, 1988." MOTION CARRIED. 

IV. GUIDELINES FOR CULTURAL CENTER APPLICATION TO ARTS COMMISSION'S PUBLIC ARTS FUND 

Theilen distributed copies of the first draft of guidelines for cultural center application 
to the PAF. Isaacs asked why the guidelines did not include requests for programming. Theilen 
explained that it was asked by Commissioner Swig to develop only guidelines for facilities 
requests . 

It was recommended that a third category under "requests" be added to include programming. 
Isaacs added that the PAF may be needed for Arts Commission operations given the current city 
deficit . 

Theilen recommended that the next draft of the guidelines, given the time needed and com- 
plexity of the issues, will be prepared for the May meeting of the NAP Committee. 

V. BUDGET RECOMMENDATIONS - CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 1988/89: PRIORITY LIST 



Theilen distributed the list of Arts Commission priorities for capital improvement funding 
for 1988-89. This list will be given to Calvin Malone of City Planning for submission to the 
Mayor as part of the city's overall capital improvement program. The list of priorities is 
summarized as follows: 

1) Cultural Center Maintenance 

2) Monument Rehabilitation 

3) Special Maintenance Projects - Cultural Centers 

4) Renovation Work: Mission, South of Market, Western Addition CC's. 

Cheilen clarified that the budget amounts on the recommendation list are from the Department 
)f City Planning. 

Commission LaRocca made the recommendation, " That the recommended priorities for the Arts 
tommission's Capital Improvement Budget for 1988-89 be approved and sent to the Dept. of 



:ity Planning ." MOTION CARRIED. 



T. NAP GENERAL FUND IMPACT REPORT 



heilen distributed copies of NAP's report requested by Arts Commission administrstion showing 
tatistical and other comparison data regarding the impact of Ad Valorem funding on NAP since 
978. 

Theilen outlined that this report shows a 10-year progression of Ad Valorem funding, number 
f NAP staff, number of communities served, match funding from other sources, and demographics 
f communities served. 

seting adjourned 6:05pm 



NEIGHBORHOOD ARTS PROGRAM - General Fund Impact Report 1978-1988 



78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82 82-83 83-84 84-85 85-86 86-87 87-88 



# of NAP Staff 



# of 
Neighborhoods /Org 
anizations Servd. 



Audience/Parti- 
cipants Demogra- 
phics 
(age, ethnic gr.) 



General Fund Sup- 
port 



Hotel Tax Sup- 
port 



National Endow- 
ment for the 
Arts 



28 



42 



500,000 

A2-30% 
A3-35% 
A4-35% 
El-15%" 
E2-30% 
E3-25% 



15 9K 



115 .K 



60.K 



Cal. Arts Council 20. K 



Foundation and 
Corporate Support 



39. K 



Arts Com. PAF 
(To cultural 
centers and 
NAP projects) 



15 



30 



510,000 
A2- 15% 
A3- 30% 
A4- 55% 
tl- 14% 
E2- 26% 
E3- 32% 
E4- 28% 



500,000 
A2-12% 
A3-28% 
A4-60% 
El-15% 
E2-20% 
E3-45% 
E4-20% 



135K 



160.K 



60.K 



17. 5K 



42. 6K 



12 



22 



100K 



189.K 



53. 5K 



32. K 



18. 6K 



10 



14 



420,000 
A2-15% 
A3-15% 
A4-70% 
El- 10%- 
E2-25% 
E3-40% 
E4-25% 



71. IK 



225. K 



55.K 



28. K 



75. K 



10.K 



350, 00C 

A2-15% 

A3-15% 

A4-70% 

El-15% 

E2-20% 

E3-40% 

E4-25% 



81. 5K 



250.K 



58. K 



20. K 



68.K 



10.K: 



360,000 
A2-15% 
A3-20% 
A4-65% 
El-10% 
E2-25% 
E3-35% 
E4-30% 



385,000 
A2-10% 
A3-25% 
A4-65% 
El-15% 
E2-25% 
E3-30% 
E3-30% 



54. 8K 



48.K 



75.K 



-0- 



-0- 



20.K 



64. 5K 



58.K 



-0- 



-0- 



-0- 



26. K 



380,000 
A2-10% 
A3-20% 
A4-70% 
El-15% 
E2-27% 
E3-33% 
E4-25% 



71. 4K 



75. K 



-0- 



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36.K 



390, 00C 

A2-10% 

A3-35% 

M-55% 

El-15% 

E2-28% 

E3-25% 

E4-32% 



77. 4K 



92. 5K 



-0- 



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26.K 



11 *1 



400,001 
A2-ll% 
A3-35% 
A4-54% 
El-18* 
E2-28% 
£3-2^ 
E4-25% 



80. 9K *• 



112.5 *4 



-0- 



*4 



-0- *4 



-0- *4 



36.K 



*5 



*1 NEIGHBORHOODS SERVED (current) 



\i. 



NAP services to the conmunity including cultural centers facilities renovation and maintenance , 
technical assistance to administrative and program planning for centers and other non-profit 
arts organizations. The Allocation provided by the Grants for the Arts (formerly Hotel Tax 
Fund) is directly managed by the boards of directors of the cultural centers. The centers are: 
Bayview Opera House, Mission Cultural Center, South of Market Cultural Center, Western Addi- 
tion Cultural Center. 

; Chinatown Neighborhood Arts Program , sharing a space with the Chinese Culture Foundation, lo- 
cated at 750 Kearny Street. The leased space understanding will terminate in 1990. Assistance 
from NAP is given to a community advisory board in program planning and oversseings of events 

J and workshops, through an administrative position paid by NAP ' (Funding allocation: Grants for 
le Arts 1987-88 - $30,000). Funds raised through events, fundraisers and donations, $5,000. 

Neighborhood Projects in Community Sites , where organizations receive funds from NAP's Grants 
for the Arts allocation. Technical assistance is given for administration of the programs 



p. 2 



NAP funding makes possible: 

1. A match to the California Arts Council for an artist-in-residence ' s partial 
salary and supplies. 

2. To stimulate funding support from foundations and corporations. 

3. To encourage local businesses and individual support. 

4 . To exhibit and produce perf orming arts events . 

G) Community Or ganizations Served Funding Support 1987-88 
Visitacion Valley Coninunity Center $12,000. 
Tenderloin Hospitality House $12,000. 

Potrero Hill Neighborhood House $7,000. 

Sunset District S.P.E.A.K.S. $2,000. 

Riclmiond District Coiuuunity Center $2,000. 

D) Sheriff 's Department Re-Entry Arts Program funding that is received in used for artists- ii 
residence for exhibits and events: 

Re-Entry Arts Projects (Funded by NAP) Funding Support 1987-88 

Galeria de la Raza (travelling exhibit) 

Liter section (Poetry reading) 

Western Addition Cultural Center (theater perfs.) $12,000. 

Mission Cultural Center (graphics and publicity) 

The NAP funding received by the above-named organizations is matched by f ounda tions ai i< 1 
private donations. These organizations also coordinate fundraisers, such as artist auctions 
ind coninunity fundraisers to match NAP support. 



l -2 KEY ID DEMOGRAPHICS CODE (NAP Audiences/Participants served ) 



GE ETHNICITY 

.1 - Pre-school (3-5yrs.) El - Asian/Pacific Islander 

2 - Youth (6 - lOyrs.) E2 - Black 

3 - Adolescents (11-18 yrs.) E3 - Caucasian 

4 - Adults (19-55yrs.) E4 - Hispanic 

5 - Seniors (55+yrs.) E5 - Native American 



3 GENERAL FUND SUPPORT - NAP 



rain 1978, following the Proposition 13 passage, the Neighborhood Arts Program's General 
ind support diminished and, it was apparent that the funding which was historically for 
irt-time unclassified positions, could not be the funding base for permanent positions 
ider Civil Service, as was mandated. 
Grants for the Arts funds gradually became the program funding for the NAP. The two lo- 
tions that are presently working are permanent, one without benefits. The General Fund 
ipport also includes $10,164 for office support and $1,000 for neigliborhood projects. 



p. 3 



*1 hi L983, the Neigliljorhood Arts Program, with the cooperation of the Grants for the Art 3 
CAO's Office transferred the allocation, or financial support ($250,000) to the cultural 
centers. NAP was also working under a deadline by the unions and the Civil Service to create 
classifications for the previously unclassified positions (NAP Director and Assistant D.u ;ec 
tor) . 

This transfer of funds allowed the cultural centers' administration and boards to hire or 
dismiss their own staff and be responsible for some of the facilities upkeep and progi aiuni.i' i 
The Arts Coninission/NAP entered into a Memorandum of Understanding that defined the cultural 
centers' board responsibilities for program staffing and fundraising. The AC/NAP also clari- 
fied its responsibilities as facilities managers for maintenance and renovation. The Cult at i 
Center boards and staff have been encouraged to set up fees and donations systems, and pro 
fiscally responsible for all funds that are raised and received for their facilities and 
services . 

In Fiscal Year 1983-84, the Neigliborhood Arts Program offered not to seek funding from stnl 
and federal sources, amd ceased to apply to foundations so that the cultural centers con I' I 
have the option to apply directly. Foundations and corporations that had supported NAI? from 
1967 to 1983 are: 



SL ; ' Foundation 

Levi-Strauss Foundation 

Crown Zellerbach 

Louis Lurie Fund 

W.A. Gerbode Foundation 

Bothin Helping Fund 

Chevron USA 

Fleishacker Foundation 

Columbia Foundation 

Evelyn and Walter Haas Fund 

Transamerica 

American Express 

If 5 Arts Commission Public Arts Fund 



Koret Foundation 

Bank of America 

Pacific Gas and Electric 

Redwood Bank 

Zellerbach Estate 

Don Richard Steven 

David Devine 

William Graham 

Swig Trust Fund 

Rosenberg Foundation 



A) The Cultural Centers are given facilities and administrative support (approximately 
$20,000 or $5,000 each yearly) . 

B) The coninunity receives grants to create specific neigliborhood projects. The organi: c\\ " 
then are able to use the support to demonstrate to the foundation, local busbies: -0: oi-i 
constituency a coimiitment to neigliborhood concerns, and, through the activities lluil rn 
created, they can, in turnm solicit the participation of local artists, youth, and the 
general public. 



Pro jects Funded 87-88 
Visitacion Valley Arts Festival 
Tenderloin Arts Festival 
Chinatown Arts Festival 
Riclimond District Festival 
Sunset District Festival 



PAF Allocation 87-88 
$3,000. 
$3,000. 
$2,000. 
$2,000. 
$2,000. 



C) The Neigliborhood Arts Program also solicits funding from the Arts Coiuuission Public Aj;I • 
Fund for the past and present projects: 

1) Yearly publication of the California Arts Council Artist-in-Residence schedule of wo.rJ 
shops (distributed free to the public) . 

2) To publish "Sources and Resources for the Visual ARtist" - A uidebook for alternative 



P- 4 



') 



galleries anf technical assistance to artists. 

'lt> publish a conprehensive guide for after-school arts programs for children. 

To provide assistance to a youth arts festival 

To provide artist danonstrations for the Children's Multicultural Museum. 

To provide scholarship assistance and art supplies for workshops in the Richmond Distri 

To support a consultant for survey of current arts apprenticeships for young people in 

non-profit sector. Future support from the PAF will be sought by the NAP for this projc 

a publication which provides information on what is available for job placement as wel.l 

proiiDting student apprenticeship in the arts. 




tUSH Neighborhood Arts Program) 

MINUTES: NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 7/21/88 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Eichelbaum, LaRocca 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Byrd, Gutierrez, Kjorvestad, Reid 

FACILITIES MAINTENANCE : Bongolan reported on the current status of maintenance 
and repair projects for the cultural centers from unused funds re-allocated 
from completed repair projects. As of this date, the repair jobs completed 
are: 1) repair of WACC's mechanical garage door; 2) installation of Bayview 
Opera House's interior lights; 3) installation of Bayview Opera House's ex- 
terior lights; 4) partial installation of SOMAR's heating system. 

What remains to be done are: 1) construction of SOMAR Gallery inset door; 
2) report on 1986-87 installation of the 3rd floor heating system; 3) repair 
of shower at SOMAR; 4) floor repair completion at Mission Cultural Center. 

RENOVATION : Theilen reported on the budget for renovation for 1988-89. What 
has been finalized is funding for MCC ' s renovation Phase III in the amount of 
$297,000. which will cover elevator construction and electrical instal- 
lation. The capital improvement project for this year is for the Mission Cul- 
tural Center freight elevator repair. 

CULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM REPORTS : SOMAR Director James Kjorvestad reported on 
recent gallery exhibits and special shows. A special reception and one-day ex- 
hibition of Cambodian masks made by students of CAC Artist-in-Residence Mark 
Knego took place on June 30th , followed by a larger group show of student mask- 
making work at the SOMAR Gallery July 6-16, entitled "Mask-Making As Art". A 
second exhibit co-sponsored with Creativity Explored, an arts program for the 
physically and mentally challenged community, took place at the Academy of Art 
student gallery (July 5-22), entitled "Giant Steps". 

Kjorvestad distributed copies of the IMAGE magazine feature page which pic- 
tured the Harvey Milk mural (June 26, 1988), Kjorvestad also reported SOMAR's 
current space usage is limited, but that planning for space use will be clari- 
fied in the next few months. 

Western Addition Cultural Center Director Charles Byrd reported on WACC's first 
Juneteenth festival outdoors in front of the center on Fulton Street, Saturday, 
June 18th, adding that the media support for this event was good, particularly 
from the Sun Reporter, which promoted the event weeks before. The press cove- 
rage helped in improving the image problem of the center. The entire Juneteenth 
Festival ran for 7 days, starting June 13 and running to June 19th. 

Byrd also reported on the center's Third Annual "Reggae Explosion", which wil 
feature as this year's headliner, Sugar Minott. Projected audience attendance 
for this year's show is at 4500, and the show will again be presented at Pier 3 
at Fort Mason. 

Byrd reported that in August, Cultural Odyssey has scheduled a series of per 
formances, including a jazz concert by Idris Ackamoor ' s Contemporary Music En- 
semble on August 17, followed by the presentation of "The Legend of Lily Over- 
street", August 26-27. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




V 



NAP COMMITTEE MINUTES 7/21/88 (cont'd. ) p. 2 

Mission Cultural Center Director Juan Pablo-Gutierrez reported on the 
election of new board members for the center. The 45 members of the 
Mission Cultural Center voted in the election. 

Gutierrez outlined the contents of MCC ' s Annual Report which showed 
the goals per each department, including the gallery, graphics, and 
education departments. 

The Galeria Museo will open with an exhibition travelling from the 
Mexico City Museum of Modern Art, of the work of Manuelo Guerra. Guti- 
errez reported that the copies of the list of new board members will 
be sent with copies of the annual reports to the Commissioners, and of 
the current class schedule, which includes 38 classes covering all dis- 
ciplines. A class in spray can art has been included through a grant 
from the McKesson Foundation, and has received the endorsement of edu- 
cation Superintendent Ramon Cortines and Mayor Agnos. 

Theilen expressed concern about the toxic substances in the spray 
paint propellants affecting class participants. 

Bayview Opera House's new Director, Gail Reid reported on the summer 
musical theater and dance workshops being taught by Judith Holten, with 
participants from local children's centers and neighborhood families. 
She added that she has begun a research survey in the community on the 
types of programs they want to see at the Bayview Opera House. Ongoing 
rehearsals are taking place at the center with both a senior and a youth 
choir, and a local theater group. 

The American Friends Service was part of a special event at the cen- 
ter's courtyard, where Reid also distributed copies of the audience sur- 
vey. AFS has expressed an interest in staying involved with the center, 
and a quarterly program is being discussed. 

Reid found from preliminary survey results that an ongoing talent show 
with local talent highlighted be initiated as part of the center's regu- 
lar programming. 

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: CULTURAL CENTER FUNDING FROM THE ARTS COMMISSION'S 
PUBLIC ARTS FUND : Theilen distributed copies of the proposed goals and 
objectives for Public Arts Fund money for the cultural centers. The goals 
were delineated into 3 categories, and the document will serve as a frame 
work for cultural center funding proposals with specific projects for 
facilities only. 

NAP AD VALOREM FUNDING ($1000) - CRITERIA FOR COMMUNITY PROJECTS : The 11 
distributed copies of the criteria for NAP Ad Valorem support ($1,000 per 
year) to community-based art programs city-wide. After review by Commis- 
sioners, it was recommended that the criteria be approved by the NAP Com 
mittee and forwarded onto the consent calendar for full Arts Commission 
approval . 



meeting adjourned 5:45pm 
fnb 




SP ^. DOCUMENTS B£fT» 

A70, 50 

* if SEP 7 138a 

HgH Neighborhood Arts ProgKf 

MINUTES - NAP COMMITTEE MEETINjg 8/18/88 

The regular monthly meeting with representatives of all four cultural center ■ 
was changed to deal specifically with the renovation of the South of Market 
Cultural Center. The September meeting of the NAP Committee will follow its 
regular agenda with issues pertaining to all four centers. 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT ; Paterson, Eichelbaum 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF ; Theilen, Bongolan 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF/BOARD ; James Kjorvestad, Ernie Rivera, James Weeks, 

Ellen Holmes-Henry, Armagh Cassil, Pamela Minor, Carlos Loarca, Isabel Ugat- 

FSSA Board member, Michael Willits - FSSA Board member. 

GUESTS ; Russ Abel - Bureau of Architecture, Adolph Rosekrans - project arch.i 

tect (Rosekrans and Associates). 

REVIEW OF PRESENT AND FUTURE PROGRAM PLANS - SOUTH OF MARKET CULTURAL CENTER 
RENOVATION 

Adolph Rosekrans presented the drawings of SOMAR's Phase II renovation plan, 
which were developed after meeting with building staff and board members, and 
with the city's Building Department to review code restrictions. In general, 
the main design problem was in the building's mixed use: warehouse and public 
assembly areas (gallery and theater spaces), and the building's size, which 
is much larger than is legal for the type of construction which the building 
will need to undergo and complete the programming spaces. 

The building is to be divided into two sections with a three-hour separation 
wall, dividing the warehouse function from the theater/gallery space. The 
theater will seat 156 people with an entrance from the outside courtyard. 
The building's front entry will be reworked to allow for handicapped access 
to the first and second floors. The elevator will be reconstructed for accesr 
to the second floor level. The building will require stairs at the main en- 
trance . 

The building's current exterior wall structure meets no building code, and 
must be reconstructed with one-hour walls throughout the entire building. Ac- 
cess to program areas, such as the Kearny Street Workshop and other spaces 
will require that a corridor be built with two exits for public access. Th e 
Costume Bank will have an entrance through the courtyard area. 

Concerns were raised that the propoerty owner/developer of the parking lot 
adjacent to the center (9th Street side) set back the property line by 15 
feet. Kjorvestad stated that the center was ready with a letter to the pro- 
perty owner inquiring about the set back. 

Ernie Rivera, Director of Technical Services raised a question about storage 
of large loads in the proposed ceiling storage area. (5000 lbs. max) . Rose- 
krans stated that the storage area probably could not accomodate that need. 

Theilen stated for clarification the the ground floor entrance will have a 
small area for reception staff for building security purposes. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




Russ Abel addressed the issue of budget for Somar ' s Phase II renovation. 
It is still unclear as to when more funds for renovation will be made avail, 
this year, given the city's budget crisis. He anticipated the earliest thai: 
money can be received for this project is 2 years from now. 

Abel also raised the issue of the current use of the building in its currenl 
state. Vehicles can be parked within, and limited maintenance on vehicles 
can be done. However, no welding, open flames of flammable liquids can be 
allowed because of the new sprinkler system. 

Kjorvestad raised a concern about maintaining the needs of the Technical 
Services program, which differ from the other Support Services. Theilen asl< 
that whatever further chnages are needed on the plan, that they be submil ted 
to the Arts Commission in writing before the next Civic Design Committee 
meeting in September, and that the board needed to give approval of ^ the plans 
as presented. Michael Willits endorsed the plan and complimented Rosekrans 
on having worked out what needed to be solved. 



Meeting adjourned 4:15pm 




^f 



£10. so 



g. Yx^wf^ 



£&§li Neighborhood Arts Program 



NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 



9/15/88 



DOCUMENTS DERT. 

0CT5 I! 



COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Eichelbaum, LaRocca 

ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen , Bongolan 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Gutierrez, Kjorvestad, Reid 

GUESTS: Maureen Gammon - Larkin Street Youth Center - Youth AIDS Art Projecb 



OAiM FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



YOUTH AIDS ART PROJECT : Maureen Gammon, Community Health Outreach Worker from 
the Larkin Street Youth Center gave a presentation on a proposed youth arts 
competition for a poster design with a message on AIDS for and from young 
people. She made a general request to the Committeee and the cultural center 
representatives for assistance, especially gallery space to exhibit the group 
of entries, and for the show to travel to various locations throughout the 
city. It is hoped that the exhibition will educate both youth and the geuei a 
public. The program directors agreed to contact Gammon individually to provide 
specific assistance. 

DISCUSSION OF PROPOSED NAP COMMITTEE MEETINGS SCHEDULE AND LOCATIONS : The i I e 1 1 
reported that from the last meeting of the NAP Committee that it was recoirniej 
ded by the Committee to have the meetings take place at the cultural centerrs 
and other community sites where NAP has programs . The following schedule w as 
proposed for the next four months: October - Bayview; 2) November - Mission; 
3) December - Western Addition; 4) January - South of Market. 

MAINTENANCE : Bongolan requested that the cultural center directors call in : 
total number of fire extinguishers at each of their buildings. NAP is curren 
working with the city-contracted fire extinguisher service company to re-charc 
all of the centers' extinguishers. 

RENOVATION: Theilen reported briefly on the August meeting at the South o 
ket Cultural Center, when the building" s renovation plan was discussed m 
viewed. The plan will not be finalized until it is reviewed and approve! _ r 
Building Inspector Young. Mission Cultural Center's funding for renovation is 
now approved at $297,000 for lights, electrical installation, and elevator in 
stallation. 

The $55,000 for deferred maintenance of all four centers has been approve! , 
as well as the $15,000 for Mission Cultural Center freight elevator repair. 

Kjorvestad questioned who was representing the cultural center at the meetin 
with the bui-ding inspector. Theilen re-assured that NAP would represent the 
center's needs at the meeting. 

PROGRAM DIRECTORS' REPORT: 



SOMAR 

James Kjorvestad added to the center's renovation report stating that the cen- 
ter is awaiting authorization from the city's Water Department to get water j 
the cneter's fire sprinklering system. The water's access into the system wil! 
complete the fire sprinklering, which needs to then be hooked into the build. 1 
fire alarm and security system. DPW-Bureau of Building Repair have been workd 1 
to re-install the wiring to the center's heater. 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




SOMAR Gallery Space will be exhibiting the work of Alfred J. Quieros starting 
September 24, and running through October. The gallery just completed an exhi- 
bition of work by Kare Andersen (August 22-31) . 

SOMAR' s two Calif ornia Arts Council Artists-in-Residence , Mark Knego and 
Mary Grauberger have been awarded their second residency grants for 1988-89. 
Kjorvestad added that the 1988 mural projects have begun this month, funded 
through ght Office of Community Development. 

Bayview Opera House 

Center Director Gail Reid reported that the Bayview Opera House has been active 
with scheduled events and that the community has been more involved with the 
center. Reid distributed photographs documenting the recent after-school clean- 
up and landscaping project. 

The SF Mime Troupe will be performing its production of "Ripped Van Winkle" 
outdoors at the center on September 24. 

Reid also reported on the progress of the center's centennial celebration. 
A Centennial staff has been hired to help with planning special and ongo in i 
programs for a after the centennial celebration . 

Reid also reported that she is proceeding with getting board members, inclu 
ding the head of the local chapter of the Urban League, Director of Fam: Ly 
Services, and accountant, and community leaders from the neighborhood. There 
are now six active board members, and the board will conduct its first meeting 
to include the Centennial Committee, which has already been meeting and who 
will become Advisory to the board. Events for the Centennial will begin in 
October and run through December. 

Mission Cultural Center 



Director Juan-Pablo Gutierrez reported on the upcoming opening of the Elvielguer 
show (reception September 16) co-sponsored by the Mexican Consulate oE SF. He 
added that Mission Grafica artist Rene Castro was asked to do a guest lecture 
and class at a university in El Salvador. The center is also planning a Day 
of the Dead poster competition with the winning poster artist awarded two 
round-trip tickets to Mexico. 

Gutierrez reported that the Friends of Mission Cultural Center met on Se - 

tember 3 to approve the center's development plan, and have agreed on the cen 

ter ' s new operating budget. 

The center is continuing is class schedule of 42 classes and is developi ig 

1 major exhibition in conjunction with the upcoming Mayan exhibit at the De 

foung Museum. 

r ISITORS AND CONVENTION BUREAU SEMINAR: Theilen distributed copies of a i 7 I e 



.dvertising a seminar on marketing the arts and culture, coordinated bj the 
'isitors and Convention Bureau and SF Grants for the Arts. She encouraged the 
'rogram Directors to attend this one-day event. 

; ISSION CULTURAL CENTER MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING : Theilen reported that 
he latest extension for MCC ' s MOU ends September 30, 1988. She stated the 
est difficulty is in the cfleter's insurance. Other compliance issues sti] I. 
eeding completion are the center's residency policies, public access pi in/ 

luilding orientation and equipment inventory. Gutierrex responded that he c m 
acted four different brokers for bids on insurance coverage and has had at 
his date, no return. Theilen recommended that a meeting be held with staff 
D complete the compliance issues as soon as possible., and asked that the 
\P Committee members make a resolution extending the MOU another 30 day: . 
immissioner Eichelbaum stated the motion: " The NAP Committee recommend;; 
msion of the FMCC - MOU for 30 days, to expire 10/31/88, to complete com- 
.iance issues." Seconded by LaRocca . MOTION CARRIED. 

beting adjourned 5:45pm 




A7o,rD 

Neighborhood Arts Program 

MINUTES - NAP COMMITTEE MEETING 12/15/88 

COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Paterson, LaRocca, Eichelbaum 
ARTS COMMISSION STAFF: Theilen, Bongolan 

CULTURAL CENTER STAFF: Byrd, Reid, Kjorvestad - absent (excused) , Gutierrez - 

absent 

FACILTIIES MAINTENANCE: The list of cultural center repair needs has been 
submitted, and a meeting was held 12/7/88 with DPW-BBR staff to review it. A 
second meeting is scheduled for March of 1989 to update and check off com- 
pleted items. 

Bongolan reminded program directors present to call in whenever DPW appears 
to make repairs and when they complete the jobs. In this way, a better tracking 
system can be developed for jobs completed and maintenance funds expended. 
DPW has also improved its monthly reporting of funds expended from the de- 
ferred maintenance budget. 

FACILITIES RENOVATION: Theilen reported that NAP is waiting on the bidding 
process to begin for Phase III at Mission Cultural Center. This renovation 
phase will cover electrical improvement and completion of construction of 
the center's passenger elevator. Theilen also reported on the bidding pro- 
cess for MCC ' s freight elevator and the difficulty of keeping to the $15,000 
budget for this item. 

An estimate is now being done with the Bureau of Engineering for the up- 
grading of the center's heating system. 

PROGRAM DIRECTOR REPORTS: Gail Reid reported on the problem the center is 
having with its roof, and that some work has begun on repairing the building's 
heater. She also reported that the $18,000 awarded by the Mayor's Office of 
Housing and Community Development will go to repair of the center's bathrooms 
and windows. The money will be made available in late January of 1989. 

The Sun Ra Orchestra Benefit Concert was successful for the center and 
Sun Ra will be in contact as a consultant for the proposed construction of 
the center's recording studio. The Senior Community Choir's 10th Anniversary 
Concert at the center drew in new audiences, while the Nuba Dance Theater, 
who recently performed at the Atlanta Black Aff.ts Festival, got a rousing 
reception at their recent performance at BVOH. 

The Zellerbach Family Fund and the Columbia Foundation has agreed to give 
support to CAC Artist-in-Residence David Major for his youth photography 
workshop, and for a travelling exhibition of the student work. The funds 
were awarded to Youth Power, Inc., the artist's sponsor. 

Western Addition Cultural Center director Charles Byrd reported that the 
center's parking lot gate needed repair, and that towing of abandoned vehi- 
cles has begun. Byrd also reported on the project work being done by the 
Recreation and Parks Department for the reconstruction of the Buchanan Street 
mall area. In consulting with the Rec . and Park staff, he pointed out that 
the center's parking lot fence, which is adjacent to the mall, was in con- 
stant need of repair. Bonnie Eng, from the Bureau of Architecture, is the 
project architect, and reported that there is a contingency fund of roughly 
10% of the entire project budget, which could be targeted for this need. 
At present, the fence is not part of any of WACC ' s renovation pla; 



45 Hyde Street, San Francisco, California 94102 (415) 558-3463 




Theilen responded that she would further investigate this. Commissioner La 
Rocca stated that when this project comes before Civic Design for review, 
that he will mention the need for the fence repair. 

WACC ' s programming included a talent showcase by United Project, coordi- 
nated by Jim Larkin, "Vignettes in Black" produced by the International Black 
Writer's and Artists League, "Art From Jail", the 3rd annual exhibit from the 
SF Sheriff's Department, two Kwanzaa celebrations, the first- by BES Children's 
Educational Theater, and the latter by Wajumbe Cultural Institute. 

The center will inaugurate its first guest curated show at Sargent Johnson 
Gallery with the premiere of its first gallery newsletter. The exhibit will 
be the work of emerging artist Fred Hayes, guest-curated by Horace Washington. 
The newsletter, tentatively called "Black Canvas", is slated to appear Janu- 
ary 17th. The gallery projects are funded in part by the National Endowment 
for the Arts - Expansion Arts Program. 

Theilen reported that the Term Purchase Agreement is being processed for $2,000 
for Sinclair Paints, to be divided equally among the centers. The Purchase 
Agreement is expected to go through at the end of December. 

MOU MEETING: NAP staff met with board members and the program director of* 
the Mission Cultural Center on compliance issues. We now have a list of items 
received that have been completed, and will meet again on 12/16/88. At the 
last meeting with MCC, it was reported that the esimate for MCC program in- 
surance was at $11,500. Final negotations are underway. At the requests of 
both the City Risk Manager and City Attorney, these must be great care taken 
now in terms of MOU compliance and risk prevention to protect the city from 
liability. 

As for WACC, an agreement must be reached on Risk Prevention Policies. Com. 
Pater son asked about the status of SOMAR's MOU. Theilen responded that it will 
also go under review. 

Meeting adjourned: 4:55pm 



11-